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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 970 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 126 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 114 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 100 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 94 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 88 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 86 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 76 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 74 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) or search for Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 3 document sections:

Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
claims of Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, Connecticut and Massachusetts, the claim of Virginia alainst it were New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia. New, the Carolinas, Georgia, Massachusetts nor Connecticut would submit to have their charter rights ihis, the cessions of Virginia, New York and Connecticut had not been accepted, and no other charterttempts to secure action on the cessions of Connecticut, New York and Virginia. A step forward wmation were Messrs. Hillhouse and Tracy, of Connecticut; Pickering, of Massachusetts; Wells and Whiy for just one year? Mr. Uriah Tracy, of Connecticut, said: And this universal consent can nevershire77 Massachusetts1919 Rhode Island44 Connecticut99 Vermont66 New York1919 New Jersey88 Pntion met December 15, 1814. Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island were represented by delegaasT. Frelinghuysen. Alabama99 Arkansas33 Connecticut66 Delaware33 Georgia1010 Illinois99 Ind[19 more...]
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
llowing States voted for the continuance of the slave trade for twenty years until 1808: New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. The following voted nay: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware anwyer from Pennsylvania and on the judgment of his cabinet, composed of Cass of Michigan, Floyd of Virginia, Toucey of Connecticut, Cobb of Georgia, Holt of Kentucky, Thompson of Mississippi, and Black of Pennsylvania, none of whom were disunionistslmon P. Chase, of Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury; Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War; Gideon Welles, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy; Caleb Smith, of Indiana, Secretary of the Interior; Montgomery Blair, of Maryland, Postmaster ballots were cast to suit. The army vote itself was given almost unanimously for Lincoln, and while in New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, Deleware, Oregon, New Jersey, Maryland and Pennsylvania the vote was close it yet appeared in the final cou
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
Stephen Russell Mallory, secretary of the navy, was born in Trinidad, West Indies, in 1813, son of Charles Mallory, of Connecticut, who settled at Key West in 1820. He was educated at Mobile, and at Nazareth, Penn., and when nineteen years old was ent maternally from the pioneers of that State. His father, Dr. John Johnston, the village physician, was a native of Connecticut. He was a handsome, proud, manly, earnest and self-reliant boy, grave and thoughtful. After studying at the Transylvfederate war in the West, was born at St. Augustine, Fla., May 16, 1824. His father, Colonel J. L. Smith, a native of Connecticut, then held the office of United States judge for the district of Florida. He was appointed to the United States militon of Mr. Lincoln, examined the machinery of the Washington arsenal, and visited the principal work shops in New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts. He purchased percussion caps at New York, had thousands of pounds of powder shipped South, and mad