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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 31 results in 5 document sections:

r history of his State memories of four years service in her defense, and the ripened intellectual powers of a life devoted to the profession of law, in which he yet maintains a high rank. As a staff officer with Generals Holmes and Breckinridge he had opportunities for gaining valuable information regarding the operations which he now describes. As colonel of cavalry, also, and as commander of Cabell's brigade in the latter part of the war, he took a conspicuous part in the campaigns in Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas and Indian Territory. The important military operations in that region, too often neglected in a view of the far-reaching war, are clearly and adequately presented in Colonel Harrell's work. The military history of Louisiana has found spirited treatment at the hands of John Dimitry, A. M. Mr. Dimitry, now engaged in journalism and literary pursuits, is the eldest son of the late eminent scholar, Prof. Alexander Dimitry, and since his boyhood has been identified with Lo
cted. The accusation may be reduced to three indictments: First. That arms were improperly distributed to the Southern States prior to and preparatory for premeditated rebellion. Tables furnished from the ordnance bureau show that these States received much less, in the aggregate, instead of more, than the quota of arms to which they were justly entitled under the law for arming the militia. It is a significant fact, utterly disproving the charge and the belligerent intent, that Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina and Texas did not receive any portion of army muskets of the very best quality to which they were entitled, and which would have been delivered to each on a simple application to the ordnance bureau. Of the muskets distributed the South received 2,091, and of long-range rifles of the army caliber, 758! Not enough to arm two full regiments! Second. That Secretary Floyd sent cannon to the Southern States. If he did the fact could not have been concealed
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
ine between the Slave and Free States, left by far the greater area of unsettled territory to the North. There remained now to the South only the territories of Arkansas and Florida and what has since become the Indian Territory. North of this line lay the immense stretch of country which embraced the present States of Michigan,lowing table of the electoral vote of that year will show: President.Vice-President. STATESJames K. Polk.Henry Clay.G. M. DallasT. Frelinghuysen. Alabama99 Arkansas33 Connecticut66 Delaware33 Georgia1010 Illinois99 Indiana1212 Kentucky1212 Louisiana66 Maine99 Maryland88 Massachusetts1212 Michigan55 Mississippi66 Senate, February 23, recommending amendments. It was amended by the Senate, and ratified as amended, March 10, by a vote of 39 to 14. Hon. Ambrose H. Sevier, of Arkansas, and Hon. Nathaniel Clifford, as envoys extraordinary and ministers plenipotentiary, carried the ratification of the amended treaty to Mexico with full powers.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
the States that certain senators from Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas, Mississippi and Florida held a meeting in Washington, on Jd to do this the legislature on the 24th, called a convention. In Arkansas the general sentiment favored the call of a convention, which the the States from invasion. Virginia, South Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas necessarily seceded, while Missouri and Kentucky announced their pn the Confederate army without regard to the place of enlistment. Arkansas was admitted into the Confederacy, and Virginia being also recognihe Confederacy was divided into two distinct parts. Tennessee and Arkansas had been cleared of insurgent control; emancipation was accepted i says the Confederate President, to regret losses in Tennessee and Arkansas, we are not without ground for congratulation on successes in Louinate were Clay and Jemison from Alabama; Johnson and Mitchell from Arkansas; Baker and Maxwell from Florida; Hill and Johnson from Georgia; Bu
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
eral, in which rank he organized a brigade of Arkansas regiments, and operated in that State until cIn March, 1864, he was relieved of command in Arkansas, and placed in charge of the reserve forces oorter, 28,000 men under Banks, and 7,000 from Arkansas under Steele. General Taylor was able to givst Louisiana and afterward of the district of Arkansas and West Louisiana. As chief of staff of Gentor Henry M. Rector, first war governor of Arkansas, was born at St. Louis, Mo., in 1816. He became a citizen of Arkansas in 1835 and soon rose to prominence as an attorney and public man. He was who succeeded Henry M. Rector as governor of Arkansas, was born at Nashville, Tenn., about the yearmoved west to Illinois, and thence removed to Arkansas in 1837, making his home in Clark county. Heaptain of Company E of the second regiment of Arkansas mounted rifles, and in a short time was promoensive agricultural interests in Kentucky and Arkansas. He represented Scott county in the Kentucky[9 more...]