hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 182 6 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 80 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 79 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Ulric Dahlgren or search for Ulric Dahlgren in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: Maryland artillery—Second Maryland regiment infantryFirst Maryland cavalry. (search)
on and Dixon's line. Emack's and Welsh's squadrons were at the point of attack. They were thrown behind the stone fences, part held mounted, and as Kilpatrick's advance charged in the pitch dark, the Marylanders sent them whirling back, and charged them mounted. These two squadrons held back Kilpatrick's division from midnight until dawn, when Jenkins got up, it having been impossible to pass the wagon train in the dark. They saved Ewell's train, his ammunition and his ambulances with his wounded. Passing on down the mountain, they again met the enemy's cavalry at Hagerstown, where a desperate hand-to-hand melee took place in the streets, and Maj. Ulric Dahlgren lost his leg. Captain Bond also received a wound which lamed him for life. After the army returned to Virginia the First cavalry served in Jenkins' brigade, and then in the brigades of Gens. Fitz Lee and Lomax until November, 1863, when it was ordered to report to Col. Bradley T. Johnson, commanding the Maryland Line.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
ms captured that morning. Two were killed and three captured. Among the captured was a lieutenant, staff officer of Colonel Dahlgren. From the prisoners was extracted with difficulty and by force the information that the enemy in front, attacking, was under Maj.-Gen. Judson Kilpatrick, with 3,000 sabers, and that Colonel Dahlgren with 500 more was on the river road and that this dispatch was to inform Kilpatrick of his whereabouts, and that he intended to charge into the city at dusk and expec a mile distant, but the Marylanders killed, wounded and captured over a hundred men. This last detachment was a part of Dahlgren's command. Colonel Dahlgren, his communication with Kilpatrick having been cut off by the capture of his dispatch at YColonel Dahlgren, his communication with Kilpatrick having been cut off by the capture of his dispatch at Yellow Tavern, had taken one hundred men and gone off to find him. He had crossed the Pamunkey at Dabney's Ferry by swimming his horses and carrying his men and ammunition over in the sunken ferry boat, which he had found and raised, and was making hi
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
elated, he finally brought together a considerable Maryland command. Toward the close of February, 1864, operating against Kilpatrick's raid, he had opportunity to render service of great value by the capture at Yellow Tavern of a dispatch from Dahlgren, and promptly acted as the emergency demanded. Gen. Wade Hampton in a letter to General Lee stated that he was convinced that the enemy could have taken Richmond, and in all probability would have done so, but for the fact that Colonel Johnson intercepted a dispatch from Dahlgren to Kilpatrick, asking what hour the latter had fixed for an attack on the city, so that both attacks might be simultaneous; and in his report the gallant South Carolinian complimented the Marylander for his gallantry in attacking the enemy at Beaver Dam, with a handful of men, and hanging on their rear, striking them continually, and never losing sight of them until they had passed Tunstall's station. Hampton further expressed his appreciation by presenting