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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 245 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 115 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 113 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 108 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for David Hunter or search for David Hunter in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 4 document sections:

ve council of five. The convention purported to represent the whole State of Virginia, and Pierpont declared that it was not the object of the convention to set up any new government in the State, other than the one under which they had always lived. A legislature was elected, which met at Wheeling, July 2d, and was called the legislature of the restored government of Virginia. This body elected two senators for Virginia, who took the seats in the United States Senate vacated by Mason and Hunter. By authority of the legislature, $27,000 in specie deposited in the Exchange bank at Weston was seized and taken to Wheeling. A resolution favoring the division of the State of Virginia was at first voted down in the Senate. The proposition to form a new State, to bear the name of Kanawha, was, however, already very strong, and a convention was called to carry out this plan. Attorney-General Bates, of Lincoln's cabinet, in a letter to a member of the convention, strongly opposed it, dec
Cloyd's mountain Newmarket Lynchburg retreat of Hunter through West Virginia Witcher's raids– other brillepartment, and he was succeeded May 21st by Maj.-Gen. David Hunter. The organization of his army in May was arses and cattle. Sigel was soon replaced by Gen. David Hunter, who advanced to Mount Jackson simultaneously h great credit. Imboden's men stubbornly contested Hunter's advance, and were reinforced by W. E. Jones, who The little army was badly defeated at Piedmont by Hunter, and Jones killed. McCausland and Jackson gallantl of Crook and Averell, delaying their junction with Hunter, and meanwhile Lynchburg was reinforced by Early. d, Imboden, McCausland and Jackson went out to meet Hunter's combined army to hold it back long enough to insuns of the city. After a battle before Lynchburg, Hunter retreated to Salem. His rear guard, under Averell,ederate cavalry. Harassed and headed off by Early, Hunter turned toward Lewisburg, and reached Gauley bridge
nemy adopting their own tactics, being surprised in camp, and two men, John B. Fay and Samuel Daugherty, captured. But McNeill's men would not rest under such a misfortune, and ten, with the fleetest mounts, under Lieutenant Dolan, hurried in pursuit. Coming up with the rear guard, they dashed into the Federals, and not only rescued their own comrades but made prisoners of the men who were guarding them. After the battle of New Market, McNeill went to the Shenandoah valley, scouted before Hunter previous to the latter's advance, then annoyed his rear guard, and when the flank movement was being made against Jones, cut his way through a Federal regiment and apprised the Confederate commander of his danger. While the captain was absent on this duty, a detachment under Lieutenants McNeill and Dolan remained near Moorefield, severely punished a raiding party sent against them in June, and about the 18th attacked their mortal enemies, the Swamp Dragons, who were escorting a train of pr
tle the Federals outnumbered the Confederates three to one. By his subsequent active movements, General McCausland delayed the contemplated juncture of Crook and Hunter and rendered the Federal movement upon Dublin a practical failure. He was immediately promoted brigadiergen-eral and assigned to the command of Jenkins' cavalry brigade. After the battle at Port Republic, June 5th, he stubbornly contested the advance of the Federals under Hunter and Crook, all the way to Lynchburg, his command of about 1,800 men being the only organized force in the front of the enemy. His tenacious contest saved the city, and in recognition of his services the citizensd from Cold Harbor in time to relieve McCausland from the pressure of the Federal troops, and McCausland and his troopers were soon upon their heels, intercepting Hunter at Falling Rock, and capturing his artillery and wagon train. Sweeping on down the valley, he was a conspicuous figure in the July raid through Maryland, levying