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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 61 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Gauley Bridge (West Virginia, United States) or search for Gauley Bridge (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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n and Franklin, was assigned to the command. July 11th he began his movement up the Kanawha river, by boat, with advance guards marching along the river roads, while another column moved up the Guyandotte and another advanced overland from Ravenswood. In anticipation of this advance General Wise arranged to meet the enemy west of Charleston, posting 900 men at Coal and 1,600 at Two Mile and Elk, with outposts at Ripley and Barboursville; while 1,000 men were scattered in the rear from Gauley bridge past Summersville to Birch river, toward Rich mountain. He could not safely make the Parkersburg diversion suggested by Garnett and Lee. Instead he asked that Garnett reinforce the Kanawha army, at the very time that the latter general was engaged in his fatal retreat On the 16th, Colonel Clarkson, with Brock's and Becket's troops of horse, had a brisk skirmish with the enemy near Ripley, and another fight occurred at Barboursville with the right of Cox's army. Wise wrote at this
ce of 1,760 men under Gen. R. H. Milroy. At first pushed back by superior numbers, on the right, also assailed on the left, the Confederates fought with such unflinching courage, Virginians and Georgians alike, that the enemy was finally repulsed. This was the bloodiest fight, so far, in western Virginia. The total Confederate loss was 20 killed, 98 wounded and 28 missing; the Federal loss, 20 killed, 107 wounded and 10 missing. After the retreat of Rosecrans to the Hawk's Nest and Gauley bridge, Lee detached Floyd for a movement up the south side of the New river, and that general crossed about October 16th, with the available portions of Russell's Mississippi regiment, Phillips' legion, the Fourteenth Georgia and the Fifty-first, Forty-fifth, Thirty-sixth and Twenty-second Virginia and 500 cavalry, in all about 4,000 men. In this southern region the enemy was in possession as far as Raleigh, having laid waste the village of Fayette and the country upon his lines of march, pene
he was gratified by the friendly waving of handkerchiefs, and shouts for Jeff Davis and the Southern Confederacy. Recrossing the Ohio at Racine, he made a demonstration against Point Pleasant, proceeded to Buffalo, crossed the Kanawha, advanced to Barboursville, and thence returned down the Guyandotte valley to Wyoming. Lightburn's command in the valley consisted of two Ohio regiments at Raleigh Court House, two companies of West Virginia cavalry at Camp Ewing, 10 miles in advance of Gauley bridge, four West Virginia companies at Summersville, and the remainder of the Ninth and Fourth infantry and Second cavalry, West Virginia Federal troops, at different points from Gauley to Charleston. He soon began concentrating upon hearing of Jenkins' movements, and the force at Raleigh fell back to Fayette. Loring advanced with a little army of about 5,000 men, organized as follows: Army of Western Virginia. Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring commanding. Maj. H. Fitzhugh, chief of staff; C
ng the enemy gallantly at New London, and on Friday, June 17th, 4 miles from Lynchburg, made a brilliant fight, losing 100 killed and wounded, after which they fell back unmolested to the fortifications of the city. After a battle before Lynchburg, Hunter retreated to Salem. His rear guard, under Averell, was defeated at Liberty, and near Salem two of his batteries were captured by the Confederate cavalry. Harassed and headed off by Early, Hunter turned toward Lewisburg, and reached Gauley bridge June 27th, moving thence to Charleston and Parkersburg, whence his army was sent back by rail to the lower Shenandoah valley. This retreat across the State was the last great military movement in West Virginia. The campaign of Early's army through Maryland against Washington and the railroad communications of Baltimore was shared by the brigades of Echols, Wharton, McCausland, Imboden and Jackson, and the batteries formerly associated with the army of Western Virginia. These command