Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Grafton, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) or search for Grafton, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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er companies into the service of the State, and posting his command at or near Grafton, to co-operate with Major Loring in holding both branches of the railroad for n, was assigned to command. Col. George Porterfield was directed to repair to Grafton and select positions for the troops in that section so as to cover the points liable to attack. The call for troops to assemble at Grafton was made on the counties of Braxton, Lewis, Harrison, Monongahela, Taylor, Barbour, Upshaw, Tucker, Masas to make men afraid to leave their families. Enlistments, especially around Grafton, were therefore slowly secured, and it became necessary about the 1st of May t he could do so without endangering his own position. Porterfield had reached Grafton on the same day that Lee's letter was written to Jackson, and found no forces anies were directed to unite as rapidly as possible at a point on the route to Grafton. These Federal and Confederate military dispositions around and within the
men, had been holding the town of Fetterman, fell back to Grafton, and sent Col. J. M. Heck, who had joined him two days befplined, which was attempting to hold the important post of Grafton, the junction of the roads connecting Washington with Parkegiment in the valley and mountain counties on the road to Grafton. Meanwhile, Colonel Porterfield had received advices of tailroad bridges at Farmington and Mannington, northwest of Grafton, and one on the Parkersburg line. Almost simultaneouslyeenth and Eighteenth Ohio, and a battery, were sent toward Grafton from Parkersburg. The troops from the northwest promptly repaired the bridges en route and occupied Grafton May 30th, the force from Parkersburg meeting with greater difficulties whi necessary accouterments. In the meantime the Federals at Grafton had been reinforced by Indiana troops, and General Morris,anies on the railroad at Cheat river bridge, a regiment at Grafton, another at Clarksburg, another at Weston, six companies a
aign to Bath and Romney. On August 3, 1861, Rosecrans had assigned General Kelley to the special military district of Grafton, embracing the Baltimore & Ohio railroad from Grafton to Cumberland, and the Northwestern Virginia from Grafton. Under Grafton to Cumberland, and the Northwestern Virginia from Grafton. Under his command nearly 4,000 men were stationed at Grafton and along the railroad. In September, Col. Angus W. McDonald, a leader in the Confederate cause in the lower Shenandoah valley, was stationed at Romney with his cavalry regiment, the Seventy-seGrafton. Under his command nearly 4,000 men were stationed at Grafton and along the railroad. In September, Col. Angus W. McDonald, a leader in the Confederate cause in the lower Shenandoah valley, was stationed at Romney with his cavalry regiment, the Seventy-seventh militia regiment under Col. E. H. Mc-Donald, the One Hundred and Fourteenth militia under Col. A. Monroe, and one gun under Lieutenant Lionberger, in all about 600 men. Upon this command an attack was made from New Creek Station, or Keyser, byGrafton and along the railroad. In September, Col. Angus W. McDonald, a leader in the Confederate cause in the lower Shenandoah valley, was stationed at Romney with his cavalry regiment, the Seventy-seventh militia regiment under Col. E. H. Mc-Donald, the One Hundred and Fourteenth militia under Col. A. Monroe, and one gun under Lieutenant Lionberger, in all about 600 men. Upon this command an attack was made from New Creek Station, or Keyser, by Kelley's soldiers, September 23d. The advance pickets being driven in, the enemy attempted to force their passage through the Mechanicsburg and Hanging Rock passes, of the South Branch mountain, toward Romney, but were repulsed at the first by Maj
c official during the ante-war period was prominent and distinguished. He was twice elected to the Virginia house of delegates, served twice as second auditor of the State, and superintendent of the State library fund; held the office of lieutenant-governor one term, and in 1860 was elected judge of the Nineteenth judicial circuit of the State. He left the bench early in 1861 to enlist in the Virginia forces as a private, and was rapidly promoted. In May, 1861, Major Boykin, writing from Grafton, recommended that General Lee appoint Judge Jackson to military command at Parkersburg, as a gentleman of great personal popularity, not only with his own party, but with those opposed to him politically, and devoted to the interests of Virginia, to the last extremity. With the rank of lieutenant-colonel, Virginia volunteers, he reported for duty to Colonel Porterfield, in Randolph county, in June. Out of the companies collected at Huttonsville, two regiments were organized, and one, the