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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 28 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 26 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 26 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 25 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 16 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 14 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Gravelly Run (Virginia, United States) or search for Gravelly Run (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ns of poorly-fed horses. So far, Grant's movement had met with but little opposition, but Hill held, threateningly, his line in front of the position that had been gained. Lee quickly transferred his cavalry and Pickett's division from his left to his right, and at the close of March 30th, with 10,000 infantry and cavalry, under Pickett, Lee's right menaced Grant's advance at Five Forks. The next morning, Lee, in person, led three brigades from his right and drove Warren's corps behind Gravelly run. Pickett forced Sheridan back to Dinwiddie Court House, but, finding Federal infantry in support, he withdrew to Five Forks, where, detached from support, Sheridan's cavalry and Warren's corps, overlapping his flanks, fell upon and routed him on the 1st of April. On the morning of the 2d of April, the Federal Sixth corps broke through Lee's attenuated line, four miles southwest of Petersburg. In an attempt to recover that captured line, the brave and impetuous A. P. Hill lost his li
s to elicit the enthusiastic praise of General Lee. During subsequent movements in the long siege, Hunton's brigade became separated from its division. On the last of March, 1865, he was ordered with his own and two other small brigades to hold the White Oak road on the left of Five Forks, where Pickett and Fitz Lee confronted Sheridan's cavalry. His line had hardly been formed when a division of Warren's infantry corps advanced and was immediately attacked by Hunton and driven back to Gravelly run. With reinforcements the Federals were able to push Hunton back to the fortified lines, but the delay that had been caused greatly embarrassed Sheridan and led to Warren's unjust suspension from command. Two days later the retreat began, and Hunton's brigade marched with Wise's brigade, and Fitz Lee's cavalry in the rear. On this mournful march it was a continual conflict with the enemy's rapid advance. On one occasion in crossing a bridge, General Hunton found it necessary to form hi