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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
s, with occasional fighting and continuous suffering for want of shoes, clothing and rations, passed the inclement winter in rugged east Tennessee. On November 20th the South Carolina commands with Bragg on Missionary ridge were the Tenth and Nineteenth, Maj. James L. White (Manigault's brigade); the Sixteenth, Colonel McCullough, and Twenty-fourth, Colonel Stevens (Gist's brigade), and Ferguson's battery. These troops fell back with the army on November 25th, and passed the winter of 1863-64 in the vicinity of Dalton. While their comrades were thus engaged in the West, the South Carolinians in the army of Northern Virginia were undisturbed except by the Bristoe campaign in October, and the Mine Run campaign in November. Abner Perrin, promoted to brigadier-general, commanded McGowan's brigade; Col. D. H. Hamilton, the First regiment; Col. J. L. Miller, the Twelfth; Col. B. T. Brockman, the Fourteenth; Col. F. E. Harrison, Orr's Rifles. This brigade, with Lane's, Scales' and Th
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
Fifth, was wounded and captured; Lieutenant Lewis, Sharpshooters, lost a leg and was captured; Captain Sorrel, adjutant-general, was badly injured by the fall of his horse. General Bratton was disabled for several weeks, during which Colonel Walker was in command of the brigade. In this engagement, Haskell's battalion took a conspicuous part. Major Haskell narrowly escaped death, and Lieutenant Mc-Queen, of Garden's battery, was severely wounded. The last service of Bratton's brigade in 1864 was a hurried expedition by rail to Gordonsville, December 23d, to the assistance of General Lomax, confronting Sheridan, from which it returned without loss. At the beginning of 1865 General Bratton reported that he entered the campaign with a total of 2,016, had lost 176 killed, 1,094 wounded and 94 missing, total, 1,364, and had present at the date of his report, a total of 1,820. He particularly commended Colonels Hagood and Howard and their regiments, and the valuable services of Adjt.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
ilently and cautiously all necessary preparations for the evacuation of Charleston, should it become necessary. General McLaws was instructed to assume command of all troops between the Savannah river and Pocotaligo, including the cavalry command of General Wheeler at Hardeeville, and the forces at Honey hill and on the Tulifinny and Coosawhatchie and vicinity, then under General Taliaferro. Beauregard was at his request relieved of the general command of the department on the last day of 1864. His presence was required at Montgomery and with the army of Tennessee. He instructed General Hardee that while the fall of Charleston would be a terrible blow to the Confederacy, the loss of its garrison would be still more fatal, and that preparations should be made for evacuation as well as for defense. On January 19th, General Butler's cavalry division was ordered to South Carolina, and Gen. D. H. Hill was put in command at Augusta, Ga. The greatly depleted corps of S. D. Lee, Stewa
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
army in 1863, and throughout the famous struggle of 1864, at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, and before RichmoMissouri and Arkansas troops. From the beginning of 1864 he was in command of this division in Arkansas, untit to Chattanooga, and during the Georgia campaign of 1864 his brigade of Alabamians and Mississippians, with r's division, and throughout the Atlanta campaign of 1864 was identified with that division. After the fall othe operations in east Tennessee, and then, early in 1864, returned to Northern Virginia. Field was now in chfied with the gallant action of his brigade. During 1864 when not disabled he was either in command of his ret the remnant fought through the Atlanta campaign of 1864 among the bravest of the heroes of that memorable ste attacks of the Federal fleets and army in 1863 and 1864. In January, 1865, he was ordered to report to Gene on duty in defense of Charleston. In the spring of 1864 the brigade under Gen. Stephen Elliott was ordered t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
in the neck at the battle of Drewry's Bluff in 1864, and was off duty sixty days; then returned andese wounds he was placed on the retired list in 1864, as stated above. He was complimented at the bed during the rest of the war. In the winter of 1864-65 he entered the field again at the head of a e, Tenn. Returning to Virginia in the spring of 1864, he participated in the fighting at the Wildern Ridge, and the fighting on the retreat, and in 1864, with promotion to ensign, he bore the colors o army of Northern Virginia, until the spring of 1864, when the regiment was detached and sent to SouHill's division was engaged until the summer of 1864, when his command was transferred to South Caroin 1831, and died at the age of sixty years, in 1864. His mother is descended from one of the oldest the entire campaign under General Johnston in 1864, from Dalton to Atlanta, being under fire aboutment, he, with others, escaped in the winter of 1864, and successfully crossed the Ohio river, seven[126 more...]