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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
the Cummings point batteries (Palmetto Guard, Captain Cuthbert) at each shot would cheer Anderson for his gallantry, although themselves still firing upon him; and when on the 15th instant he left the harbor on the steamer Isabel, the soldiers of the batteries lined the beach, silent and uncovered, while Anderson and his command passed before them. Thus closed the memorable and momentous attack upon Fort Sumter by the forces of South Carolina, and thus began the war which lasted until April, 1865, when the Southern Confederacy, as completely ruined and exhausted by fire and sword as Fort Sumter in April, 1861 , gave up the hopeless contest and reluctantly accepted the inevitable. The following is believed to be a correct list of the officers who commanded batteries, or directed, particularly, the firing of the guns, with the commands serving the same: On Cummings point: (1) Iron battery—three 8-inch columbiads, manned by detachments of Palmetto Guard, Capt. George B. Cuthber
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
e shared the fortunes of his regiment until April, 1865, when he was captured and carried to Hart'sere he was confined until the early part of April, 1865, and was then exchanged after having been iwed and he did not regain his liberty until April, 1865. Returning to his home in Mississippi he radet corps was disbanded at Spartanburg, in April, 1865, he returned to Charleston, and in Decemberfter his release from Rock Island, Ill., in April, 1865, he returned to his home in Newberry countympany was disbanded at Hillsboro, N. C., in April, 1865. Lieutenant McLendon was struck several timured and paroled near Greenville, S. C., in April, 1865. He was in the battle of Honey Hill, and w disabled by the concussion of a shell. In April, 1865, he was captured in hospital at Cheraw, andt he was held at that military prison until April, 1865, when he was released on parole. At the cleneral Reynolds' command at Athens, Ga., in April, 1865. During the time he was in the service he [1 more...]