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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Dearing or search for Dearing in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
Federal infantry. At an important period of the battle on the right, when the Federal left had been driven back and was exposed to the full fire of Fort Magruder, every gun was turned upon it. In the afternoon, and just before D. H. Hill's attack on his right, the Federal commander had gained a position almost turning the Confederate left. At this critical juncture, the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth South Carolina regiments, with the Fourteenth Alabama, Major Royston, splendidly supported by Dearing's and Stribling's batteries, and three guns under Lieutenant Fortier, met the movement with firmness, and, aided by the fire from Fort Magruder, checked and repulsed the Federal right, and held the Confederate left intact. General McClellan claimed a great victory at Williamsburg, basing his claim upon the occupation of the town the next day, the capture of 300 prisoners and 1,000 wounded, and five guns. But the fact is, that the battle was fought by General Johnston with two divisions
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
n the morning of September 14th General Hampton moved upon his famous expedition to capture a herd of cattle which the Federal army was grazing near Coggins' point, on the James river. He took with him the division of W. H. F. Lee, Rosser's and Dearing's brigades, and 100 men from Young's and Dunovant's brigades, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Miller, Sixth South Carolina. Moving down Rowanty creek to Wilkinson's bridge the first day, General Hampton next found it necessary to pass to thckwater at Cook's bridge, where he believed the enemy would not be looking for him, the bridge having been destroyed. After constructing a new bridge, he crossed at midnight, and his force advanced in three columns, one under Lee, another under Dearing, while Hampton himself, with the commands of Rosser and Miller, moved directly on Sycamore church. Each column was successful in its attack early in the morning, though stubbornly resisted, and Rosser pushed on and secured the cattle, 2,486 in