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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
dy referred to; and the account given by the accomplished engineer on duty at Fort Sumter, Maj. John Johnson, in his valuable book on the Defense of Charleston Harbor. Gen. W. B. Taliaferro, who hed on the fort, and kept up the bombardment for the whole day and until 7:45 in the evening. Major Johnson's careful estimate is that the bombardment was from a total of sixty-four guns and mortars. distinguished for his personal gallantry. Speaking of Wagner and its remarkable strength, Major Johnson, than whom no more competent judge could testify as to the qualities of a defensive work, paccount of this most interesting period of the history of Battery Wagner and Fort Sumter. In Major Johnson's book the full record will be found, and in the reports and correspondence published by act over Wagner, and the fleet engaged Fort Sumter. Covering the period August 16th to 26th, Major Johnson makes the notes following: August 16th. Engineers' working force, 350 to 450, having bee
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
hells and mortars. Colonel Elliott was slightly wounded, Capt. Edward D. Frost and 10 others were killed, and 40 sustained more or less serious injuries. Capt. John Johnson, Lieut. L. A. Harper and Capt. M. H. Sellers were distinguished for bravery and coolness amid the excitement and danger. The fire was not entirely extinguigh the heroic efforts of its garrison, under eighteen months of constant fire, the stronghold was maintained as an effective part of the city's defenses. Says Major Johnson: From having been a desolate ruin, a shapeless pile of shattered walls and casemates, showing here and there the guns disabled and half buried in splinterent Mitchel, one of the most gallant officers of the artillery service, was mortally wounded while making an observation from the highest point of the fort. Capt. John Johnson, the faithful engineer-in-chief, was severely wounded on the 28th. But in spite of this terrific bombardment, and a new sort of attackā€”floating powder boat
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
oil manufacture. In connection with this business he has an interest in a flour mill, and attends to his farm. In May, 1869, he married Miss Gambrel, a daughter of Mr. Reed Gambrel, of Anderson county, S. C., and they have six children. Major John Johnson, former major of engineers in the Confederate States service, and widely known as the author of the valuable historical work, The Defense of Charleston Harbor, is a native of Charleston, born in 1829. He was educated until he reached the ficer on the staff of General Hardee. In that capacity he participated in the battles of Averasboro and Bentonville, and was then transferred to the staff of Gen. J. E. Johnston as acting chief engineer of the army. With the return of peace Major Johnson resumed his theological preparation; in January, 1866, was ordained deacon in the Protestant Episcopal church, and in 1867 was ordained priest. He served as rector of Grace church, Camden, until 1871, and then became assistant minister of St