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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Mary Ann King or search for Mary Ann King in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
up to the battle of the Wilderness on May 6, 1864. Early that morning his regiment, one of the first of Longstreet's corps, met the enemy, who were at the time forcing back A. P. Hill's men, and there he fell, his breast pierced by eight minie balls. He had a soldier's burial and his remains are now a part of Virginia's sacred soil. James Jackson Kennedy, a citizen of Edgefield county who with three sons were soldiers of the Confederacy, was born in Edgefield county in 1810, married Mary Ann King, and as a blacksmith and farmer was prosperous and happy at the beginning of the Southern struggle for independence. In 1862, however, being staunchly devoted to the cause of his State, he enlisted as a private in a company from Augusta, Ga., with which he was on duty until the close of hostilities. He died of fever in August, 1865. His three sons, all under nineteen years of age, who served in the Confederate cause, were William, who was a private in the First South Carolina regiment