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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John McCulloch or search for John McCulloch in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
n the legal profession. Charles E. McCulloch Charles E. McCulloch, of Greenville, for about a quarter century identified with the interests of that city, is a native of Georgia, born in DeKalb county, February 5, 1843. He is the son of John McCulloch, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, who became a planter in Georgia and married Mary Crowley, a native of that State. Mr. McCulloch enlisted, May 31, 1861, in the Seventh Georgia regiment of infantry, distinguished during the war as a part of Mr. McCulloch enlisted, May 31, 1861, in the Seventh Georgia regiment of infantry, distinguished during the war as a part of Gen. George T. Anderson's brigade, Longstreet's corps. He served with his regiment throughout the war, fighting in many important battles, notable among which were First Manassas, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, Fredericksburg, Suffolk, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, the fighting around Petersburg, and on the retreat to Appomattox, where he was surrendered. At Second Manassas he was captured while waiting upon his older brother, James McCulloch, of the same company, who had been mortally wounded