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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
mated by the Confederates, and it was believed that an army of at least 25,000 or 30,000 could be thrown upon James or John's island in an advance upon Charleston from that direction, while a powerful fleet of armored vessels might be expected to attack by the harbor. The Federal commander, with a similar overestimate of the Confederate forces, wrote to Washington in the latter part of April, 1862, rating General Pemberton's forces as follows: At Savannah, 30,000; at Charleston, 25,000; at Augusta, 10,000; a total of 65,000 He was doubtless better informed by the intelligent crew of the Planter, and then determined upon the occupation of James island. The Planter was stolen by her negro crew on the 13th of May, and two gunboats entered the Stono on the 20th following. The channel was open, the guns were all gone from the forts on Cole's and Battery islands, and the gunboats threw their 11-inch shells with perfect impunity on the right and left as they ran up the river. They anc
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
nuary 19th, General Butler's cavalry division was ordered to South Carolina, and Gen. D. H. Hill was put in command at Augusta, Ga. The greatly depleted corps of S. D. Lee, Stewart and Cheatham, army of Tennessee, were on their way to reinforce Generraham's Station on the South Carolina railroad, which was destroyed, while Blair threatened Branchville, and Kilpatrick, Augusta. The latter was met by Wheeler's cavalry in battle at Blackville, Williston and Aiken, the Confederate leader winning aeffective infantry and artillery, more or less demoralized, occupy a circumference of about 240 miles from Charleston to Augusta. The enemy, well organized and disciplined, and flushed with success, numbering nearly double our forces, is concentratth. Generals Cheatham and Stewart had by this time brought what remained of their corps, pitifully few in numbers, to Augusta, in the vicinity of which General Wheeler had his cavalry, and General Hampton urged the most rapid movement possible of
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
mplished daughter of Maj. Robert Martin, of Augusta, Ga., who died when their son, Robert M., was th, he enlisted in the Washington artillery, of Augusta, commanded by Captain Girardeau. He served w. He then reported to the provost marshal at Augusta and served in that department until the close he enlisted as a private in a company from Augusta, Ga., with which he was on duty until the close oseph J., who joined the Richmond Hussars, of Augusta, and died of pneumonia, at Orange Court House5, he was married to Miss Margaret Land, of Augusta, Ga., daughter of Robert H. Land, a gallant Conf business manager of Nelson, Morris & Co., Augusta, Ga., and the other, James F., is a lawyer at Abe walked to Mayfield, found transportation to Augusta, and thence continued his tramp, barefooted, Milberry L., wife of William S. Mobley, of Augusta, Ga. By his marriage in 1879, to Henrietta M. Bee was born October 31, 1835. He resided at Augusta, Ga., four years during his youth, and from 1852[9 more...]