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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 958 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 615 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 562 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 454 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 380 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 343 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 340 20 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 339 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 325 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 308 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Braxton Bragg or search for Braxton Bragg in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
received into Confederate service April 16th. Major Larey resigned his commission early in June, and John B. Villepigue, a South Carolinian who had had seven years service in the United States army, was elected major and assigned by order of General Bragg. A month later he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and in September Capt. William L. Lovell, Company G, became major. The Vicksburg artillery and Jackson artillery, of Mississippi, were attached to the battalion in October, and the combid to the Thirty-sixth regiment Georgia volunteers. The first Georgia soldiers at Pensacola were the volunteers organized at Atlanta by Capt. G. W. Lee, who took his command to the Florida port, with a letter from Adjutant-General Cooper to General Bragg, of date March 19th, in which it was stated that this company, consisting of 100 men, chiefly artisans, is exclusive of the quota which has been required from that State, and the secretary of war desires you will cause the officers and men to
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
o arrived at Pensacola, Fla., in the spring of 1861, found the city and navy yard in the hands of a small force under General Bragg. These Georgia commands were Ramsey's First Georgia regiment, Villepigue's First Georgia battalion, Capt. Isadore P.ccupied Fort McRee. The Federal steamers taking position as close as possible reinforced the heavy guns of Pickens. General Bragg reported that this would rank with the heaviest bombardment then known in the world's history. The houses in Pensacoening destruction to the whole garrison. Throughout their stay at Pensacola the Georgians won the favorable attention of Bragg, the general commanding, and when he was about to be transferred to another field, he asked that the Fifth Georgia might sacola and its defenses were abandoned by the Confederates. Capt. I. P. Girardey's battery (the Washington artillery of Augusta) and the Thirty-sixth Georgia regiment, formerly Villepigue's First Georgia battalion, also accompanied General Bragg.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
ws' raid the Third infantry at South Mills the conscript act and State troops Georgians under Bragg and Kirby Smith naval affairs depredations in the coast region war Legislation Chickasaw Basaved the city from attack and capture, without bloodshed and carnage. In the campaign under Bragg through Kentucky and Tennessee, undertaken to protect Chattanooga and Atlanta by carrying the wacommand. The Third Georgia cavalry, Col. Martin J. Crawford, accompanied Gen. Joseph Wheeler in Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and fought gallantly and suffered severely at Munfordville; but at New Haverty-third Georgia. The foregoing troops were all in Gen. Kirby Smith's army. In Polk's wing of Bragg's army in Kentucky there were other Georgia commands. In Withers' division the Fifth Georgia shch had had a similar experience though with less resistance, held an advanced position until General Bragg withdrew his army. The Third lost 6 killed and 33 wounded; the Ninth, 1 killed and 11 wound
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
(I), J. J. Bowen (K). This regiment was assigned to the army of Tennessee; was for a time in north Mississippi; went with Bragg into Kentucky, and was especially distinguished at Perryville, where it had two color-bearers killed and four wounded, anthe remainder of its honorable career. The Jackson Artillery, Capt. G. A. Dure, served in east Tennessee and then with Bragg in middle Tennessee, being engaged in the battle of Murfreesboro, then in the Chattanooga campaign of 1863, and in the Atcampaign of the Carolinas in 1865. Girardey's battery, under Capt. 1. P. Girardey, served at Pensacola, then went with Bragg to Mississippi and was conspicuous in the battle of Shiloh. Howell's battery, Capt. Evan P. Howell—see Martin's batter North. Maj. S. W. Davitt became colonel of this regiment. It was sent to east Tennessee in 1861. In July, 1862, before Bragg entered upon his campaign into Kentucky, it participated in the brilliant cavalry victory of Forrest at Murfreesboro, for
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
reat battles of the war. On August 20th, Gen. Braxton Bragg, with headquarters at Chattanooga, had o this time hid behind the Lookout range. General Bragg perceiving these movements evacuated Chattneral Crittenden's corps. The orders of General Bragg indicate that he was planning attacks in dfrom attack. Rosecrans now more clearly saw Bragg's position and McCook was ordered to hurry bacthe defeat of the Federal army was prevented. Bragg said: The resistance of the enemy's cavalry anat Longstreet's corps had made a junction with Bragg, and contemplating the events of the day, it ianged position of the right wing, he abandoned Bragg's plan of movement, and arranged that Stewart and gathering up the spoils of victory. General Bragg has been criticised for not following up h that every hour is worth a thousand men. Yet Bragg did not think it proper to pursue. Rosecran, 2,003 captured or missing, total 17,804. General Bragg's field return a week later showed an effe[20 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
Johnston given command close of 1863. On November 3, 1863, General Bragg summoned Longstreet, Hardee and Breckinridge, then his infantry of great importance had occurred at Chattanooga. On the 20th, General Bragg had notified the President that Sherman had reinforced Grant, anorthward behind the hills, prepared to bridge the river and attack Bragg's right at the northern extremity of Missionary ridge. On the 23d eph T. Smith was mentioned for special gallantry. Hardee did for Bragg at Missionary Ridge what Thomas had done for Rosecrans at Chickamauere. A rumor was afloat that Longstreet would make a junction with Bragg at Dalton the next day. Grose's brigade advancing to reconnoiteron any terms or conditions whatever. At Dalton, December 2d, General Bragg issued an address of farewell to the army of Tennessee, and turanufactories. Alluding to the problem of permanently replacing General Bragg, he said only that if General Beauregard were considered suitab
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ores, and a number of prisoners in Wheeler's care. In reply to an inquiry from General Johnston he was informed by General Bragg, now acting as military adviser with office at Richmond, that he was desired to have everything in readiness for a fo was not promised. General Johnston was furnished a plan of campaign by the war department, brought by Colonel Sale, General Bragg's military secretary, in which it appeared that the great result desired by the Confederate government was the reclaidemonstrating to the foe our determination to abandon no more territory without at least a manful effort to retain it. Bragg telegraphed President Davis, The moral effect of the brilliant affair of the 22d is admirable on our troops, and I am haparrisons at various points; and held the line of the Georgia railroad east by strong intrenchments on his right flank. Bragg had organized cavalry movements to protect the West Point railroad in Alabama, and Gen. Stephen D. Lee —who had won disti
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
1,237, shows present with Hood on above date 49,137 of all arms. On the 11th Hood telegraphed Bragg, now at Richmond, that he wished to move by the left flank as soon as possible, so as to interrusta and Macon, but he hoped to save them by his proposed flank march. On the 22d he advised General Bragg that if Sherman did not move south he would cross the Chattahoochee and form line of battle there learning of the Federal movements eastward, moved rapidly to Macon. Wheeler notified Generals Bragg and Hardee, General Beauregard at Tuscumbia, Gen. Howell Cobb, General Taylor at Selma, Geneer to the south on the same day and moved to the support of the Confederates. On the 25th General Bragg reached Augusta and took command. Wheeler, pushing on to Sandersville, reinforced the localin the defense of Fort Fisher, below Wilmington, N. C., where they came under the command of General Bragg. Unfortunately, they were not permitted to take part in the gallant defense of that strongh
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
the State. For this purpose the various brigades were disposed throughout the State. General Upton, who was ordered to Augusta, caused the arrest of Vice-President Stephens, Secretary Mallory and Senator Hill. President Davis arrived at Washington, Ga., the home of Gen. Robert Toombs, May 4, 1865, and remained there about thirty-six hours. His family was with him, consisting of Mrs. Davis and four children, accompanied by her sister, Miss Howell, and Midshipman Howell, her brother. General Bragg, Gen. I. M. St. John, Gen. A. R. Lawton, Postmaster-General John H. Reagan, General Breckinridge, secretary of war, and a considerable number of other Confederate officials and officers, also arrived at Washington. On the 5th this party, the last representatives of the Confederate States government, separated, General Reagan alone accompanying the President in a westward direction. At Irwin's cross-roads and at Dublin they were threatened by strolling bands, but escaped danger. At day
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
red to go with Longstreet to the assistance of Bragg in north Georgia, and after the investment ofl, Captain Boggs was sent to the assistance of Bragg at Pensacola. His skill in mounting artilleryions was highly praised by both Beauregard and Bragg. He was warmly commended by General Bragg, inGeneral Bragg, in his report of the fight on Santa Rosa island, for the close reconnoissances on which the expeditioe organization which insured its success. General Bragg, in a letter to Richmond in October, named Mississippi, and Coxe's Sharpshooters, in General Bragg's army during the campaign in Kentucky in ristmas day, 1863, he received orders from General Bragg to bring up to the front all of his brigadwn's division, was assigned to the army of General Bragg. At the battle of Murfreesboro, which clort of the field. When Longstreet went to help Bragg in September, Wofford's was one of the brigadeeutenant. He was attached to the staff of General Bragg at Pensacola, at the same time was aide-de[2 more...]