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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 18 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 62 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 39 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 27 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 25 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 25 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Howell Cobb or search for Howell Cobb in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
o rise with steadily increasing volume, and strengthening the views and fears of those who could see relief only by withdrawing from a union which had fallen under the control of a party favoring a policy so antagonistic to the rights and interests of the South. Yet even at this stage there was a small minority who resolutely strove to stem the swelling tide. A speech was made by Alexander H. Stephens before the legislature, firmly opposing immediate disunion; while, on the other hand, Howell Cobb, in a letter apparently invincible in logic, demanded immediate secession. Herschel V. Johnson and Benjamin H. Hill stood by Stephens. The momentous news that the convention of South Carolina had adopted an ordinance of secession from the United States, telegraphed to the important cities and towns of Georgia on the afternoon of December 20, 1860, added impetus to the universal excitement, and to the enthusiasm of those who favored immediate secession. Popular approval of this decisi
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
d Johnson; Thirteenth volunteers, Col. Walker Ector; Fourteenth volunteers, Col. A. V. Brumby; Fifteenth volunteers, Col. T. W. Thomas; Sixteenth volunteers, Col. Howell Cobb; Seventeenth volunteers, Col. H. L. Benning; Eighteenth volunteers, Col. William T. Wofford; Nineteenth volunteers, Col. W. W. Boyd; Twentieth volunteers, Co S. Flint; Poole by T. H. Jackson; Mattox by J. A. Gaines, and Culver by Mark Latimer. The Sixteenth regiment Georgia volunteers was organized as follows: Col. Howell Cobb; Lieut.-Col. Goode Bryan; Maj. Henry P. Thomas; Adjt. T. W. Cumming; Commissary L. McGuire; Quartermaster R. Thomas; Capts. James S. Gholston (A), A. M. Reynbattlefields it gained distinction, being also one of the regiments that followed Longstreet through the Chickamauga and east Tennessee campaigns. Its colonel, Howell Cobb, became a major-general in the army of the Confederate States, and his successor, Goode Bryan, a brigadier-general, being succeeded as colonel by James S. Ghols
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
equaled. This battery and Hamilton's and Lane's were assigned to the reserve artillery under Colonel Pendleton. In General Magruder's district, the peninsula, the Sixth, Tenth and Sixteenth, under Alfred H. Colquitt, Lafayette McLaws and Howell Cobb, and Cobb's legion under T. R. R. Cobb, well sustained the reputation of the State. McLaws was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to important command, and Colonel Colquitt was given charge of a brigade including the Sixth and Sixteenth.Cobb's legion under T. R. R. Cobb, well sustained the reputation of the State. McLaws was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to important command, and Colonel Colquitt was given charge of a brigade including the Sixth and Sixteenth. Late in the year the Twenty-third regiment, unarmed, was sent forward to Yorktown. An unfortunate incident in the history of Cobb's legion is preserved in the official reports of General Magruder. It appears that a scouting party had been fired upon, and he had sent forward an ambuscading force to the vicinity of New Market bridge. While the troops were moving into position on the morning of November 13th, says Magruder, two of my vedettes approached the infantry position of the Georgia legi
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
encounters was one October 22d at Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie, in which Col. G. P. Harrison was in command of the troops sent from Georgia. This was a considerable affair and a decisive victory for the Confederates. Brig.-Gen. Hugh W. Mercer had succeeded to the command of the district of Georgia upon the transfer of General Lawton to Virginia, and on September 24th General Beauregard assumed command of the department of South Carolina and Georgia, to which Florida was soon added. Gen. Howell Cobb, after the battle of Sharpsburg, was assigned to command of the middle district of Florida, with especial reference to the defense of southwest Georgia, a region which had been blessed with the best crops in the State. In the latter part of the year the State commissioners, James M. Chambers and James F. Bozeman, sunk obstructions in the Appalachicola to prevent a river invasion and protect the gunboat Chattahoochee, then in construction. In July, 1863, the following organizations w
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
son, W. A. Lamand and J. T. Kennedy, (K) E. W. Westbrook. The Ninth Georgia regiment of cavalry was organized with the following officers: Col. G. I. Wright, Lieut.-Col. B. S. King, Maj. M. D. Jones, Adjt. James Y. Harris; Capts. (A) T. B. Archer, (B) M. D. Jones, (C) W. G. Deloney, (D) G. I. Wright, (E) W. C. Dial, (F) W. D. Jones, (G) William M. Williams, (H) J. E. Ritch, (I) W. B. Young, (K) F. E. Eve, (L) A. M. Rogers. The history of this splendid command can be found in the sketch of Cobb's legion, which has already been given. Throughout its long and active service there were many changes. The officers who during this time succeeded those named above were: Capts. (A) Z. A. Rice, T. P. Stovall, B. C. King, O. H. P. Julian, J. J. Thomas, B. C. Yancey, C. H. Sanders and W. L. Conyers, (B) L. J. Glenn and William W. McDaniels, (C) T. C. Williams, (D) C. H. Camfield, W. J. Lawton, J. F. Wilson and W. A. Winn, (E) B. S. King, T. B. Cox, W. S. C. Morris, (F) William T. S. Powell
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
fect. Lieutenant Pope, of the Troup artillery (Cobb's legion), Capt. Marcellus Stanley, performed the Sixteenth and Eleventh Georgia regiments and Cobb's legion. The first onset of the enemy was sucBut this disorder was promptly corrected by General Cobb, who rode to the front, and by his coolnessle-pits gained by him and across the pond. General Cobb mentioned among the casualties the severe wer, and the personal daring and coolness of General Cobb. Colonel Anderson's brigade, it has been no brigade under Gen. P. J. Semmes, and supported Cobb and Anderson at the close of the fight, which end, the brigades of George T. Anderson, Toombs, Cobb and Semmes were aligned in the order named, on n included the Tenth and Fifty-third, and Gen. Howell Cobb's brigade had for its main strength the Sixteenth and Twenty-fourth regiments and Cobb's legion. Ambrose R. Wright, former colonel of the Th; and Captain Wright and his cavalry company of Cobb's legion (acting as escort) are referred to as [2 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
held the main road at the Boonsboro gap, and of Cobb's brigade, who withstood Franklin's corps at Crnt well until the center was broken. Even then Cobb was able to check the enemy's advance by momentand Col. W. C. Holt was among the wounded. General Cobb was in command of all the Confederate forceGeneral Semmes, who exposed himself, as did General Cobb, with great intrepidity. Col. John B. Lama day. The loss of the Georgians was very heavy, Cobb's legion losing 190 killed, wounded and missing. Sanders, Twenty-fourth Georgia, who commanded Cobb's brigade during the first part of the engagemeGen. Thomas R. R. Cobb, who had succeeded Gen. Howell Cobb. On the night of December 11th, the brigates troops swarmed up in the field in front of Cobb's brigade until the space was packed. The Confneral McLaws has written that about 1 p. m. General Cobb reported that he was short of ammunition. g the fighting at Fredericksburg the cavalry of Cobb's Georgia legion accompanied Gen. Wade Hampton [11 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
j. John M. Millen; Twenty-second battalion artillery, Col. E. C. Anderson; Chatham light artillery, Capt. Joseph S. Cleghorn; Chestatee light artillery, Capt. Thomas H. Bomar; Columbus light artillery, Capt. Edward Croft; Joe Thompson artillery, Capt. Cornelius R. Hanleiter; Martin's light artillery, Capt. Robert Martin; Read's light artillery, Lieut. J. A. Maxwell; Terrell's light artillery, Capt. E. G. Dawson. The First regulars, under Colonel Magill, was on duty in Florida, under Gen. Howell Cobb; the Eighth battalion, Maj. B. F. Hunt, was on James island, S. C.; the Forty-sixth regiment, Col. P. H. Colquitt, and the Twenty-first battalion of cavalry, Maj. William P. White, were at Charleston. The total number of effectives on duty in the State for coast service was a little over 12,000, while the forces in South Carolina and Florida, from which reinforcements might be hoped in emergency, were about 17,000. The defenses of Savannah at this time were quite elaborate and exte
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
most brilliant of all Lee's victories. With 60,000 men he attacked and defeated Hooker's army, 130,000 strong. Into this struggle the Georgians of the army of Northern Virginia were led in seven splendid infantry brigades, besides the cavalry and artillery commands, the organization of which at this time it will be interesting to cite: In the First corps, the division of Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws contained the brigade of Gen. W. T. Wofford— Sixteenth regiment, Eighteenth, Twenty-fourth, Cobb's legion (infantry), Phillips' legion (infantry); and the brigade of Gen. Paul J. Semmes—Tenth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. C. Holt; Fiftieth, Lieut.-Col. F. Kearse; Fifty-first, Col. W. M. Slaughter; Fifty-third, Col. James P. Simms. Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright commanded a brigade of R. H. Anderson's division—Third regiment, Maj. J. F. Jones; Twenty-second, Lieut.-Col. J. Wasden; Forty-eighth, Lieut.-Col. R. W. Carswell; Second battalion, Maj. G. W. Ross. In Jackson's corps were four brigades: On<
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
iment, Col. Goode Bryan; Eighteenth, Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; Twenty-fourth, Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips' legion. Lieut. E. S. Barclay. In Hood's divisioconsidered as beginning with the battle of Fleetwood (Brandy Station). In this hard-fought battle Cobb's Georgia legion, commanded by Col. P. M. B. Young, was complimented by General Stuart, who said reat cavalry battle on the third day at Gettysburg and in the preceding and succeeding movements, Cobb's and Phillips' Georgia legions bore a gallant part. The loss in Cobb's legion at Gettysburg waCobb's legion at Gettysburg was 8 killed, 6 wounded and 7 missing. Phillips' legion suffered a loss of 1 killed and 9 wounded. Hampton's brigade, to which these two commands belonged, had a greater loss than any other brigade of Stuart's command, and Cobb's legion lost more in killed than any other regiment of the division except the Seventh Virginia, which lost an equal number. Hampton had a fight of his own with the enemy o
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