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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 278 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 202 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 140 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 115 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 102 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 79 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 53 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Lafayette McLaws or search for Lafayette McLaws in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S.rgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
R. A. Hardee, Corker (killed) and T. J. Hardee; Belt by R. V. Fulcher and Thomas Rought; King (died) by M. E. Sparks. Tenth regiment Georgia volunteers: Col. Lafayette McLaws; Lieut.-Col. J. B. Weems; Maj. R. R. Hawes; Adjt. R. G. Strickland; Commissary G. H. Cheever; Quartermaster S. T. Neal. The captains were O. S. Kimbrough ( C. Kibbee (G), P. H. Loud (H), Y. L. Wotton (I), J. P. W. Read (K). This regiment served throughout the war in the army of Northern Virginia. Its first colonel, Lafayette McLaws, became a major-general and was succeeded by Alfred Cumming, for a short time lieutenant-colonel and later promoted to brigadier-general, whereupon Lieut. H. Colquitt; Seventh volunteers, Col. L. J. Gartrell; Eighth volunteers, Col: Francis S. Bartow; Ninth volunteers, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth volunteers, Col. Lafayette McLaws: Eleventh volunteers, Col. George T. Anderson; Twelfth volunteers, Col. Edward Johnson; Thirteenth volunteers, Col. Walker Ector; Fourteenth volunteers, Co
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
d by Col. Francis S. Bartow. The disposition of the other Georgia troops was as follows: The Sixth and Tenth regiments were sent to Yorktown and vicinity, Col. Lafayette McLaws, with the Tenth, being put in command at Williamsburg; and Ramsey's First, which had experienced soldier life at Pensacola, formed part of the force under o the reserve artillery under Colonel Pendleton. In General Magruder's district, the peninsula, the Sixth, Tenth and Sixteenth, under Alfred H. Colquitt, Lafayette McLaws and Howell Cobb, and Cobb's legion under T. R. R. Cobb, well sustained the reputation of the State. McLaws was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to imMcLaws was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to important command, and Colonel Colquitt was given charge of a brigade including the Sixth and Sixteenth. Late in the year the Twenty-third regiment, unarmed, was sent forward to Yorktown. An unfortunate incident in the history of Cobb's legion is preserved in the official reports of General Magruder. It appears that a scouting pa
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
he pond. General Cobb mentioned among the casualties the severe wounding of Capt. James Barrow, of his staff, while delivering orders. Colonel Bryan called special attention to the bravery of Captain Montgomery, Company D, Sixteenth regiment, who displayed coolness and gallantry during the assault of the enemy. A second assault was attempted by Mc-Clellan's forces, but under the steady fire of the Confederates they could gain no headway. General Magruder highly commended the skill of General McLaws, division commander, and the personal daring and coolness of General Cobb. Colonel Anderson's brigade, it has been noticed, came to the rescue at the most important moment, winning special distinction, and later, says Magruder, Brigadier-General Toombs, commanding the division which included Anderson's brigade, advanced with his own brigade under Gen. P. J. Semmes, and supported Cobb and Anderson at the close of the fight, which ended at nightfall. This action brought credit to some of
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
to Frederick City, Md. Thence Jackson's corps and portions of the divisions of McLaws and John G. Walker were diverted westward to attack the 12,000 Federal soldiersg out of about 2,200. The Georgians of Semmes' and Cobb's brigades fought with McLaws. Col. C. C. Sanders, Twenty-fourth Georgia, who commanded Cobb's brigade durin000 maimed, dead and dying, lying on that horrible field of destruction. General McLaws has written that about 1 p. m. General Cobb reported that he was short of athe Sixteenth Georgia, which had been detached, to report to General Cobb. General McLaws also tells how a Georgia boy, William Crumley, an orderly of General Kershah unaffected sympathy in the sorrow which overwhelmed his native State. As General McLaws has said, every one esteemed him warmly who knew his great intellect and gmter battalion), were on the crest of the hills occupied by the division of General McLaws. One of Carlton's guns on this occasion was commanded by Lieut. W. F. Ander
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
to cite: In the First corps, the division of Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws contained the brigade of Gen. W. T. Wofford— SixEarly to defend Fredericksburg, also menaced by the enemy, McLaws marched with Wofford, Semmes and Kershaw to reinforce Andeort of Gen. R. E. Lee as follows: A strong attack upon General McLaws was repulsed with spirit by Semmes' brigade, and Generhe head. As the Federal lines gave way on Sunday morning, McLaws and Anderson pressed forward to a union with Jackson's cor a loss of 553 killed and wounded. Of Sunday's battle, General McLaws said: General Wofford threw a portion of his men adivision, claimed their share equally. On May 2d while McLaws and Anderson, with the Georgia brigades of Wofford, Semmesmorning General Early attacked Sedgwick in the rear, while McLaws and Anderson attacked in front. Early's attack began before that of McLaws and Anderson. As the brigades of Hoke and Hays crossed Hazel run to move toward the right, Gordon's briga
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
he battle, four more Georgia brigades were brought into action. In McLaws' division were the brigade of Gen. P. J. Semmes—Tenth regiment, Colventeenth, Col. W. C. Hodges, and Twentieth, Col. John A. Jones. McLaws' division got into position opposite the Federal left about 4 p. m.e Little Round Top, where they intrenched with rocks that night. McLaws division was severely engaged at the wheatfield and peach orchard. e of prisoners. On the evening of the third day, an order from General McLaws improperly conveyed caused Colonel DuBose to be sent with his racy dashed in vain. Anderson struck the Federal line just north of McLaws, and Wright's Georgians were on the north end of Anderson's line, tcommand. In Col. H. C. Cabell's artillery battalion, attached to McLaws' division were two Georgia batteries, the Troup artillery, Capt. H. North Carolina battery. This battalion, which opened the fight of McLaws' division, July 2d, was placed in position near the crest of a hill
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
ve movements of the next day by which they gained the victory. All the Federal commands except two brigades had been engaged in the fight of the 19th, while Bragg yet had Breckinridge, Hindman and Preston to put in, and Kershaw and Humphreys of McLaws' division were expected next day. It is estimated that the Federal strength was 45,855, and Confederate 33,897, actually engaged on the 19th. That night Longstreet arrived, and he was assigned to command the left wing of the army, consisting ohose to his right and left continued to press the enemy with such spirit and force that he could not resist us. Brigadier-General Law succeeded to the command of Hood's division, and Brigadier-General Kershaw to the command of the two brigades of McLaws' division. General Kershaw, having received no definite orders himself, being under the command of General Hood, was not advised of the wheel to the right, and gained more ground to the front than was intended in the movement of his two brigade
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
nnessee river, to compel the surrender of Rosecrans, but a division of the army at this later period did not appear to him as practicable. The advance against Knoxville being decided on, Longstreet was given for the expedition his two divisions, McLaws' and Hood's, with Wheeler's cavalry, to which Buckner's division was added. Ransom's Southwest Virginia division, mainly cavalry was ordered to co-operate. It was ten days later before Longstreet was able to cross the Tennessee at Loudon and beT. W. Cumming, of the Sixteenth Georgia, said General Longstreet in his report, with great gallantry marched up to the fort with 10 or 12 of his men and made his way through an embrasure to the interior, where the party was finally captured. General McLaws reported concerning this fight: The conduct of General Bryan during the siege and afterward, and especially at the assault, is worthy of all praise. He led his brigade to the work, and after seeing that all was done that could be done, w
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
f Beaulieu battery, where Lieut. W. W. Carnes took command of the Waterwitch, which was added to the Confederate flotilla. According to the report of Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws, in command on the Georgia coast, the following was the strength of the Confederate posts and garrisons in that department in August: At Thunderboltod's Twenty-ninth Georgia battalion, 302 strong, and three companies South Carolina cavalry, 134 men, were on coast guard from the Ogeechee to St. Mary's. General McLaws stated that to be relieved from guard duty for an entire day was an uncommon occurrence with any soldier of his little command. On August 17th, one of the coles P. Daniel, was also stationed; and in Florida were two companies of the Twenty-second battalion. On October 31st the Georgia troops under command of Major-General McLaws on the coast, including the Fifth district of South Carolina, were as follows: First regulars, six companies Second battalion and Barnwell's battery, u
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