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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 146 0 Browse Search
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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
Eighth Georgia regiment had suffered heavily, being exposed, as it took and maintained its position, to a fire from the enemy already posted within 100 yards of their front and right, sheltered by fences and other cover. It was at this time that Lieutenant-Colonel Gardner (commanding the Eighth) was severely wounded, as were also several other valuable officers. The adjutant of the regiment, Lieutenant Branch, was killed, and the horse of the regretted Bartow was shot under him. Finally Sherman's and Keyes' Federal brigades, having found a passage of Bull Run above the Stone bridge, threatened the rear of these gallant and stubborn fighters, and General Bee was compelled to order them back. But valuable time had been gained, during which Jackson had brought his brigade up to an advantageous position, and the disorganized troops had been rallied on the new line formed by Beauregard and Johnston. The Georgians now joined in the impetuous charges which swept the enemy before them i
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
bayou, a brigade of Georgians, organized in east Tennessee under Gen. Seth M. Barton, and thence transferred to Mississippi to meet the invasions under Grant and Sherman, took a conspicuous part in the defeat of Sherman by the Confederate forces under the command of Gen. Stephen D. Lee. This brigade was composed of the Fortieth rSherman by the Confederate forces under the command of Gen. Stephen D. Lee. This brigade was composed of the Fortieth regiment, Col. Abda Johnson; the Forty-second, Col. R. J. Henderson; the Forty-third, Lieut.-Col. Hiram P. Bell, and the Fifty-second, Col. C. D. Phillips. The brigade took position at the Indian mound, covering one of the bayou fords which the enemy attempted to cross in their endeavor to pierce the Confederate line, and on the 28rate assault, the main one of the battle, was made upon General Barton's position at the center, also upon the right, and the repulse of it determined the fate of Sherman's campaign. The skirmishers, taken from the Fortieth and Forty-second Georgia, bore the brunt of the attack. Their comrades, reinforced by Colonel Phillips' reg
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
J. D. Watson, served during the campaign of 1864, especially in the defense of Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea. The First battalion Georgia reserves, Augusta fire brigade, was commande Mehaffey. This regiment was especially engaged in the defense of Savannah during the march of Sherman to the sea after the fall of Atlanta. The officers of the Third Georgia reserves were Col. Eistinction to the closing scene at Appomattox. A part of this battalion was at Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea and the siege of that city in December, 1864. The Cherokee Light ArtillerChickamauga and Knoxville campaigns; also in the Atlanta campaign in Wheeler's corps; fought in Sherman's front on the march to the sea, and finally in the campaign of the Carolinas. The following aremained with Wheeler and shared in his efforts to save as much as possible from the ravages of Sherman's cavalry and bummers. On the 30th of January, 1865, ten companies formed the Twelfth Georgia
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
heroes of the siege was Lieut. George D. Wise, ordnance officer of Cumming's brigade, who before the opening of the land campaign had made daring reconnoissances, was distinguished in the battle of Champion's Hill, and after the Federal lines had been drawn about the fated city, carried dispatches between Pemberton and Johnston, seeming to be able to go and come at will, as if he bore a charmed life. Walker and his Georgians took part in the ineffectual defense of Jackson, Miss., against Sherman, after the fall of Vicksburg. Here also Marcellus A. Stovall, former commander of the Third battalion, was present, with the rank of brigadier-general, commanding among other regiments the Forty-seventh Georgia. Turning attention from the western to the eastern fields of conflict, it is observed that almost simultaneously with the fall of Vicksburg occurred the deadly grapple of the Northern and Southern armies at Gettysburg, from which the army of Northern Virginia returned shattered a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
General Bragg had notified the President that Sherman had reinforced Grant, and a movement on our ltion preceded and partly covered the march of Sherman's main body in a circuit northward behind thes taken, exposing the Confederate left, while Sherman suddenly appeared on the right, crossing the r that Hooker's fight on Lookout mountain, or Sherman's assault on the Confederate right, was unattled again by the divisions of Jeff. C. Davis, Sherman's corps from Vicksburg, and Howard's corps from Virginia, all under command of Sherman. Smith's Texas brigade, supported by part of Govan's Arkir gallant bearing and noble death. In General Sherman's account of the fight he says: The enemyhe lower edge of the field and reformed. General Sherman contends that his main attacking columns ently, stubbornly and well. But at 3 o'clock Sherman's command remained in statu quo, and he did ninggold at the close of the fight and ordered Sherman to send a brigade down east of the ridge to f[2 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ermaster's and medical stores, some subsistence stores, 13 heavy guns and carriages, 28 carloads of ordnance, 81 cars and 5 engines. The subsistence stores were distributed among the citizens, and the heavy guns were unavoidably lost. At Jonesboro Sherman heard the explosions at 2 a. m. and 4 a. m. of the 2d, and thought that perhaps Slocum was making a night attack on the city. But that officer postponed his triumphal entry until later in the morning of the 2d. Stewart and Lee's corps mmen. But Hardee comments on this: The casualties in my corps alone during that time considerably exceeded 7,000 in killed, wounded and captured. Hood estimated the loss under Johnston, including missing, at 22,750. The effective strength of Sherman's army was reported June 30th at 106,070; on July 31st, 91,675; on August 31st, 81,758. The Federal medical director reported that between May 1st and September 6th there were received in hospital 19,557, of whom 1,718 died in the field hospita
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
dvance in North Georgia attack on Allatoona Sherman's March to the sea fall of Fort McAllister rossing of the Chattahoochee toward his rear, Sherman left General Slocum and his corps to guard At00 strong, was sent against Allatoona, one of Sherman's most important depots, where were stored ab up to the strong position. About 10 a. m. Sherman had reached Kenesaw mountain, and seeing the Mill Creek gap, about 1,000 prisoners in all. Sherman moved into Snake Creek gap, through which he and 5,500 cavalry under Kilpatrick. Under Sherman's orders Capt. O. M. Poe thoroughly destroyedms, remove all subsistence from the course of Sherman's army, and destroy what could not be carriedtenant-General Taylor also was, reported that Sherman was doubtless en route to the sea, thence to In his report of the march to the sea, General Sherman declared that he had destroyed the railrod to be upon her soil during the march of General Sherman from her northeast border to the city of [29 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
out of the 22,349 paroled infantry of the army, or nearly one-fourth. Early in February, General Sherman began his march northward from Savannah. He moved in two columns, one threatening Augusta ivision, Hampton's cavalry, and such other forces as could be gathered to resist the advance of Sherman, who was reinforced by Schofield's corps at Wilmington. In the organization of the army undein command of 1, 500 cavalry operated on the Georgia side of the Savannah during the advance of Sherman and kept on guard against raids into Georgia. Gen. Joseph Wheeler performed a great service whee, bearing a letter from Gen. Howell Cobb announcing an armistice between Generals Johnston and Sherman. Before General Wilson could reach the front to make investigation, Colonel White dashed into and Mackall and the garrison were held as prisoners of war. When informed of the armistice by Sherman, General Wilson issued the necessary orders to carry it into effect, and General Cobb gave ever
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
he commanded a brigade in the division of Gen. Hugh W. Mercer during the siege of that city by Sherman's forces. Lieutenant-General Hardee, who was in command, did not expect to be able to hold Savannah against a determined attack, but did hope to hold it long enough to compel Sherman to pass by the city, in order to communicate with the Federal fleet and obtain the supplies which he was sure by the court martial. In 1864, being placed in command of the district of Georgia, he opposed Sherman's march through the State as well as possible with the limited means at his command. He commanurther advance of the Federal army toward the heart of the Confederacy. A vigorous attack upon Sherman had been Walker's desire from the opening of the campaign. No more gallant life was offered upwas sent to Augusta to gather reinforcements and aid in the defense of that city, threatened by Sherman. Subsequently, with promotion to major-general, December 30, 1864, he was actively engaged in