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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
fantry, and was with Evans' Georgia brigade, army of Northern Virginia, until the surrender at Appomattox; while the Sixty-third Georgia was sent to Dalton, serving from that time until Johnston's caproughout the war in the army of Northern Virginia, being at First Manassas and surrendering at Appomattox. The following changes in organization occurred: Colonel Gartrell was promoted to brigadier-g regiment served in the army of Northern Virginia, being at First Manassas and surrendering at Appomattox, also with Longstreet at Chickamauga and in east Tennessee. Its first colonel, Bartow, commaul to every duty, it served in Wright's famous brigade (afterward Sorrel's) and surrendered at Appomattox. The Third Georgia battalion, as at first organized, had the following officers: Lieut.-Col share in the Seven Days battles, thenceforward serving in the army of Northern Virginia until Appomattox, where, in the division commanded by Gen. Clement A. Evans and the corps of John B. Gordon, it
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
ificent body of infantry from Seven Pines to Appomattox. Its colonel, Edward L. Thomas, became brigom the spring of 1862 until the surrender at Appomattox, where, in the division commanded by Brig.-Gm the spring of 1864 to the closing scene at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. The successors to the officchmond and Petersburg and the final scene at Appomattox. During its period of service the successorordon's corps in the campaign that closed at Appomattox. During this long and arduous career the loyland and Pennsylvania, until they closed at Appomattox in a defeat which was decisive and final, anparticipated in the campaign which closed at Appomattox. Some of the successors to the officers at and the campaign against Grant, closing with Appomattox. The Twelfth Georgia battalion of artilleuation of those cities, ending its career at Appomattox. Scogin's Light Artillery, or the Griffinrmy of Northern Virginia from Seven Pines to Appomattox, making a record which gave the battery grea[11 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
Chapter 18: Final campaign in Virginia Georgia commands at Appomattox campaign of the Carolinas Wilson's raid. The Georgia brigades in the army of Northern Virginia bore an honorable part in the military operations of 1865. Though reduced in numbers, they maintained their relative strength in an army where all of prisoners and driving his assailant from the field. A few minutes later he received official notice of the surrender and slowly withdrew his command toward Appomattox. This successful charge shed a parting glory over the last hours of the illustrious army of Northern Virginia. Following is the organization of the Georgia he grand total present for the army at that time was 51,014 infantry. Hence it appears that one man in six in General Lee's army in 1865 was a Georgian. At Appomattox, the following numbers of officers and men were paroled in the Georgia brigades: In Anderson's 987, Benning's 809, DuBose's 347, Simms' 190, Cook's 350, Evans'
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
the Knoxville campaign, and in subsequent movements in east Tennessee until ordered back to Virginia. On February 26, 1864, he was commissioned brigadier-general, and he served as chief of artillery of Longstreet's corps until the surrender at Appomattox, participating in the battles of the Overland campaign, and in those of the long protracted siege of Richmond. After the war he was professor of mathematics and of civil and military engineering in the university of South Carolina from Januaryosition he served at first on the right of Lee's army at Hatcher's run, and subsequently in the trenches immediately opposite Petersburg. In the retreat of Lee, his division was in some kind of fighting almost daily, and in the final attack at Appomattox he led it into action, being engaged at the moment of the actual surrender. General Evans was in nearly all the battles in Virginia, and was five times wounded, twice severely. His military training for the war was obtained in the volunteer c