Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
summer of 1864 the Twelfth Georgia battalion, with two companies added, was sent to Virginia as infantry, and was with Evans' Georgia brigade, army of Northern Virginia, until the surrender at Appomattox; while the Sixty-third Georgia was sent to Dalton, serving from that time until Johnston's capitulation in North Carolina, in the army of Tennessee. Additional particulars of the Twelfth Georgia battalion and the Sixty-third Georgia regiment will be found in the sketch of those two commands. Onder Gen. David Hunter, but was forced to surrender. The prisoners were soon exchanged and in service again. A detachment from this regiment also served at Battery Wagner in 1863. The First volunteer regiment under Colonel Olmstead was sent to Dalton in May, 1864, and served thenceforth in the army of Tennessee until the surrender in North Carolina, April 26, 1865. The next command organized to serve outside the State was a battalion, formed in response to the telegraphic request of Govern
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
I) L. L. Elkins, (K) George Eason. The regiment served for some time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, being one of the regiments engaged in the heroic defense of Battery Wagner on Morris island, near Charleston. Sent to Dalton in the spring of 1864, it participated in the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns. In the spring of 1865, having been consolidated with the Thirty-seventh Georgia regiment and Fourth Georgia battalion of sharpshooters, it took part in the campaign ohus formed was called the Sixty-third Georgia. The regiment served as infantry and heavy artillery at Thunderbolt and Rosedew island, and two of its companies (B and K) at Battery Wagner near Charleston, in 1863. In May, 1864, it was ordered to Dalton. It served in the Atlanta campaign, being particularly distinguished at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, where it was complimented in general orders; in the Tennessee campaign, where with the First volunteer regiment it formed part of the rear gu
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
H. Hill's corps reached Lafayette, the left flank of the new Confederate position, and Cleburne's division was posted at the three passes of Pigeon mountain near Lafayette, Catlett's gap, Dug gap, and Blue Bird gap, from which the Confederates could see Thomas' men marching into the valley on the west. Rosecrans believed at first that Bragg was retreating to Rome, and instructed Crittenden to leave one brigade at Chattanooga and follow the enemy's retreat vigorously by way of Ringgold and Dalton. This brought Crittenden's advance to Ringgold on the 10th, on the Confederate right flank. Near there Pegram's cavalry brigade encountered his mounted pickets and captured 59 prisoners. On the 11th, Crittenden, having found Bragg, began moving west from Ringgold, and on the 12th he was at Gordon's mill on Chickamauga creek with his corps. Wilder's mounted brigade, covering the movement, had a severe skirmish at Leet's tanyard with the Sixth Georgia cavalry, Col. John R. Hart, and Rucker
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
issionary Ridge battle of Ringgold gap retreat to Dalton Gen. J. E. Johnston given command close of 1863.ave to be crossed in the first half mile out toward Dalton. Consequently it was a dangerous position if the eds of the creek and the deeply cut roads leading to Dalton. Cleburne's division, silent, but cool and ready, that Longstreet would make a junction with Bragg at Dalton the next day. Grose's brigade advancing to reconte Union on any terms or conditions whatever. At Dalton, December 2d, General Bragg issued an address of fas responsibility December 27, 1863. On arriving at Dalton he found a letter of instructions from Secretary Seill Creek gap; Breckinridge lay between the gap and Dalton; Hindman was mainly southwest of Dalton; Stevenson Dalton; Stevenson near Hindman; Walker east of Dalton, and Cheatham south of Walker. Grant's army, 80,000 strong, occupied ChatDalton, and Cheatham south of Walker. Grant's army, 80,000 strong, occupied Chattanooga, Bridgeport and Stevenson. During 1863 two regiments of Georgia State troops were organized with E.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
rganization of Johnston's army campaign from Dalton to the Chattahoochee Resaca, New Hope church rmy of the Cumberland by gaining possession of Dalton and as far south of that as possible. In compld. Long's brigade of cavalry advanced toward Dalton. The whole Federal strength in this movement divisions before Mill Creek gap, northeast of Dalton, and Stevenson north of Dalton. On February 2Dalton. On February 24th, Palmer advanced in three columns, the center directed against Wheeler's cavalry. As Thomas rep of May, Johnston's army was concentrated near Dalton. Stewart's and Bate's divisions were in Mill wn army there in one night's march, held on at Dalton until compelled to let go. On the evening osissippi, he calmly maintained his position at Dalton. During the 11th and 12th he annoyed the enemwith full list of casualties, states that from Dalton to Jonesboro his company lost 10 killed and mes' and Kelly's commands attacked and captured Dalton, with a large amount of stores and government [7 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
ragg, now at Richmond, that he wished to move by the left flank as soon as possible, so as to interrupt the communications of Sherman. In accordance with this plan, Wheeler was directed to enter north Georgia again, destroy the railroad south of Dalton, and connect with Jackson, who was to be sent across the Chattahoochee. Wheeler promptly obeyed the orders and again caused an interruption of a week or two on the Western & Atlantic railroad. On the 18th, having caused the iron to be removed saca and demanded its surrender, but the Federal garrison was reinforced in time for safety. Sherman also followed to Resaca, but before his arrival on the 14th, Hood had destroyed the railroad thence to Tunnel Hill and captured the garrisons at Dalton, Tilton and Mill Creek gap, about 1,000 prisoners in all. Sherman moved into Snake Creek gap, through which he had passed in the opposite direction five months before, and was delayed there by the Confederate rear guard. At Ship's gap, Col. Ell
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
tate forces were collected. When these were sent to other points and Bragg had fallen back upon Dalton, Iverson was put in command of a Georgia brigade of cavalry in Martin's division of Wheeler's cohe first to check the enemy after the Confederate lines were broken. When the army fell back to Dalton he was transferred to General Walker's division, with which he participated in the Georgia campa brought these troops to a high state of efficiency in drill and discipline, and when ordered to Dalton in the spring of 1864 he commanded the largest brigade in the army. Just before this the Confederate government had made a new issue of Confederate money. When the command reached Dalton, the other soldiers dubbed them New Issue, but on the first occasion that called for fighting they conducteto Georgia and engaged in the business of planting in Dooly county until 1887. Then he moved to Dalton, where he adopted the profession of a teacher. Brigadier-General Edward Lloyd Thomas Briga