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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The blockade and the cruisers. (search)
and manned, and took part in the battle of Port Royal. From their rapid construction, they were commonly known as the ninety-day gunboats. Nine of them were in Farragut's fleet at the passage of the forts below New Orleans. They were an important addition to the navy, and were actively employed both in fighting and blockading drew-frigates of 1855, as they failed to show their usefulness, except perhaps at Port Royal and at Fort Fisher. The Colorado could not be got over the bar, when Farragut went up to New Orleans, and the Roanoke and Minnesota were helpless at Hampton Roads. In the latter half of the war, however, the Department undertook the constore could be said of the squadron at New Orleans, though the ironclad Mississippi, if accident and mismanagement had not delayed her commission, might have given Farragut's fleet some annoyance. At Mobile the Tennessee, under the gallant Buchanan, fought almost single-handed the whole fleet, only to be captured after a heroic def
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter II (search)
862 all the squadrons were well provided in this respect, though some of the centres of occupation were occasionally recovered by the enemy. Especially on the coast of Texas, blockade and occupation alternated at the different Passes throughout the war, partly in consequence of the want of troops to hold the occupied points. Curiously enough, too, these centres of occupation became in a small way centres of blockade-running—Nassaus and Bermudas on a diminutive scale. Norfolk, Beaufort in North Carolina, Hilton Head with its sutler's shops, Pensacola, and New Orleans each carried on a trade, prosperous as far as it went, with the surrounding coast. At New Orleans, the blockade of Lake Ponchartrain was kept up long after the city was taken, not to prevent access to the port, but to capture the illicit traders that cleared from it; and Farragut was obliged to remonstrate sharply with the Collector for the readiness with which papers covering the trade were issued by the custom-house
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
d hoisted his flag in the Wabash on October 29. Goldsborough remained in command just a year. He was relieved September 5, 1862, by Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, who retained the squadron for two years. The later blockade of Wilmington was brought to a remarkable state of efficiency, through the untiring efforts and zeal of the officers of the squadron. In the last year of the war, when the expedition against Fort Fisher was decided on, the command of the North Atlantic Station was offered to Farragut, and, upon his declining it, Porter was appointed. Porter entered upon his duties October 12, 1864, and Lee was transferred to the Mississippi. The first step in the conversion of the blockade of the North Atlantic coast into a military occupation was the capture of the forts at Hatteras Inlet, by Stringham, with a small body of troops under General Butler, August 29, 1861. This was followed, in February, 1862, by the expedition of Goldsborough and Burnside against Roanoke Island, and
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
s closed by the surrender of the forts to Admiral Farragut and General Granger. In the latter par and a sufficient force sent to the station. Farragut had been selected to command the expedition a extending from Pensacola to the Rio Grande. Farragut remained in command until late in 1864, when as with active operations in the Mississippi, Farragut early turned his attention to the necessitiess was the want of troops. In December, 1862, Farragut writes: It takes too much force to hold the prbor and entrance. By the end of November Farragut held nearly all the principal points in the We, but we certainly make a good many prizes. Farragut was not quite accurate in his comparison, as to catch those in the course of time. But Farragut's hope of improving the efficiency of the Gulout of his crew of 112. Upon this proceeding Farragut makes the following brief comment: It is diffdiately after the arrival of the Clifton, Admiral Farragut sent Commodore Bell to Galveston with the
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
ade, and he worried from time to time the English steamers in the West Indies, thereby causing unnecessary friction. He incurred the displeasure of the Department by several unwarranted acts, but particularly by the retention of vessels, as a part of his command, which belonged to other squadrons or had been ordered on special service. The Oneida and the Cuyler, which had been sent in pursuit of the Florida after her escape from Mobile, were among the vessels appropriated in this way; and Farragut was led to express himself strongly on the subject, and to suggest that if any of Wilkes's ships came into his neighborhood, he should adopt a similar line of action. But the fatal mistake made by Wilkes was in detaining the Vanderbilt; and in consequence of this and other causes of dissatisfaction, he was relieved in June, 1863, by Commodore Lardner. After the Alabama had reached the West Indies, in November, 1862, it was foreseen that she could not remain long in that quarter; and th
.; taken, 64; burned, 65 Craven, Commodore, commands Potomac flotilla, 87 et seq. Crocker, Acting Master, commands expedition to Sabine River, 142 et seq. Crosman, Lieutenant, 124 et seq. Cumberland, the, 48, 52, 60 et seq.; sunk by the Merrimac, 63 et seq. Cushing, Captain, daring exploits of, 94 et seq., 101, 161 Cuyler, the, 122, 135, 139 Dahlgren, Admiral, 105 Downes, Commander, 117 et seq. Dupont, Admiral, 90, 105, 115 Ericsson, John, plans monitor, 55 Farragut, Admiral, 90, 123, 141, 145 et seq., 148, 150 Florida, blockade of, 124 et seq. Florida, the, fights the Massachusetts, 132; runs blockade of Mobile, 137 et seq., 184 et seq.; captured at Bahia, 187 Flusser, Lieutenant-Commander, 97; killed, 98 Fisher, Fort, 90 Fox, Captain Gustavus V., 61 (note), 66 (note), 234 et seq. Freeborn, the, 86 Galveston, Tex., blockaded, 35, 140 et seq., 143 et seq. Georgetown, 87 et seq. Georgia, the, built, 214; cruises, 214 et seq.; sold,