Browsing named entities in James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for West Indies or search for West Indies in all documents.

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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
kade. Notwithstanding the very inadequate force on the station, the vessels of the squadron acted upon the assumption of the existence of an efficient blockade. On July 16, the British brig Herald, two days out from Wilmington, was captured by the St. Lawrence, on the edge of the Gulf Stream, two hundred miles from land. This was so clearly a case of capture under a paper blockade, that the Herald was afterward released. Three days earlier, Pendergrast, then in command of a projected West India Squadron, was lying at Charleston, and published anew his proclamation of April 30, announcing an efficient blockade of Virginia and North Carolina, and repeating the warning that he had a sufficient naval force here (that is, at Charleston) for the purpose of carrying out the proclamation. Proclamations, however, even though they may be of questionable validity, are not entirely without effect. Hickley reported that trade on the coast of North Carolina was stagnant; and, as has been alr
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
A flying squadron was fitted out to cruise in the West Indies, and the command was given to Captain Charles Wilrida, and the fact that they were cruising in the West Indies, went on to say: The Department has information his purpose... The instructions designated the West Indies and Bahamas as the cruising ground, and named theied from time to time the English steamers in the West Indies, thereby causing unnecessary friction. He incurrore Lardner. After the Alabama had reached the West Indies, in November, 1862, it was foreseen that she coults. You can then visit any of the islands of the West Indies, or any part of the Gulf, at which you think you tisfied that the Alabama has left the Gulf or the West Indies, and gone to some other locality, you will proceehs in the North Atlantic. His next field was the West Indies. On each of these stations he found a large numb unprotected merchant-vessels. After leaving the West Indies, he posted himself near the equator, in the track