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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 1,936 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 142 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 22 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 18 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Atlantic Ocean or search for Atlantic Ocean in all documents.

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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
nted. Porter entered upon his duties October 12, 1864, and Lee was transferred to the Mississippi. The first step in the conversion of the blockade of the North Atlantic coast into a military occupation was the capture of the forts at Hatteras Inlet, by Stringham, with a small body of troops under General Butler, August 29, 18sible to the blockade-runners. Port Royal then became the centre of occupation, and the headquarters of the fleet. The principal centre of blockade in the South Atlantic was Charleston. An attempt was made early in the war to close the entrance by placing obstructions in the channel. A number of vessels, most of them old whaclosed when the Sounds were occupied after the battle of Port Royal. The Confederates were not at any time sufficiently strong to raise the blockade on the South Atlantic coast. The raids that were made with this object—sudden dashes into the midst of the blockading fleet—though well organized and conducted, failed to accompli
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
ool. Those who were unwilling to go returned to England in the other vessel; and the Alabama started on her cruise. The first two months were spent in the North Atlantic. In this time twenty prizes were taken and burnt. In one or two cases, there were at least doubts as to the hostile ownership of the cargo; but the prize-cotions of neutrality. Meantime the Georgia had escaped. The Georgia's career extended over a period of one year, during which she cruised in the Middle and South Atlantic. She was at Bahia in May, 1863, and at Simon's Bay in August. Late in October she arrived at Cherbourg, where she lay for four months, part of the time unde on his way to another cruising-ground; and unless his movements could be foreseen, he was tolerably safe from pursuit. He passed his first two months in the North Atlantic. His next field was the West Indies. On each of these stations he found a large number of unprotected merchant-vessels. After leaving the West Indies, he p
seq.; decisions against, 38 et seq.; stratagems of, 38 et seq., 91; description and history of, 153 et seq. Blockading squadron, East Gulf, 123; difficulties of, 123 et seq. Blockading squadron, Gulf, 121 et seq. Blockading squadron, North Atlantic, 90 et seq. Blockading squadron, South Atlantic, 90, 105 et seq.; disposition of, 115, 116 Blockading squadron, West Gulf, 123 British Government, warlike preparations of, 180 et seq.; violation of neutrality by, 190, 200, 225 et seq. South Atlantic, 90, 105 et seq.; disposition of, 115, 116 Blockading squadron, West Gulf, 123 British Government, warlike preparations of, 180 et seq.; violation of neutrality by, 190, 200, 225 et seq. Brooke, Lieutenant John M., 22; restores Merrimac, 54 Brooklyn, the, 11, 121, 173 et seq., 195, 198 Buchanan, Captain, Franklin, commands Merrimac, 62; wounded, 68, 76 Cape Fear River, 91 et seq. Chaplin, Lieutenant, bravery of, 86 Charleston, S. C., blockade of, 34, 84 et seq., 87 et seq., 107 et seq.; attempts to raise blockade of, 109, 111 et seq., 158 et seq. Chicora, the, attempts to raise blockade of Charleston, 109 et seq. Clarence, the, 186 Clifton, the, 143,