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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 79 13 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 66 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 54 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 49 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 33 5 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 23 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 21 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Charles Wilkes or search for Charles Wilkes in all documents.

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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
steamer could make at times fourteen knots, her highest speed that day was twelve and a half. At night the Florida changed her course and ran off to Cuba, where she was burning prizes the next day, while the Cuyler was looking for her in the Yucatan channel. On the day after the Florida ran out, the Oneida was sent to Key West with despatches for Admiral Bailey, informing him of the escape of the Florida. Bailey sent her to the coast of Cuba; but she missed the Confederate cruiser, and Wilkes, commanding the Flying Squadron, having fallen in with her, constituted her a part of his force, as well as the Cuyler, to the no small injury of the blockade; an act which subsequently brought down upon him the displeasure of the Department. Galveston, the third point of importance in the Gulf, was, like Mobile, comparatively easy of blockade, except against vessels of the lightest draft. The absence of strong fortifications, especially in the early part of the war, enabled the blockadi
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
screw-sloop San Jacinto, commanded by Captain Charles Wilkes. Early in November, 1861, the San Jacvy Department, somewhat prematurely, gave Captain Wilkes an emphatic commendation. But the Secretan that Great Britain, by condemning the act of Wilkes, had for the first time acknowledged the illegvessel and sending her in for adjudication. Wilkes probably had some such idea in his mind, for h illegality was due to the principle, of which Wilkes lost sight for the moment, that the captor of ls were subsequently added to the squadron. Wilkes sailed from Hampton Roads in the Wachusett on e, ran directly into his cruising ground. But Wilkes was unable to find them; and the main purpose on the subject, and to suggest that if any of Wilkes's ships came into his neighborhood, he should ctions. This judicious plan was defeated by Wilkes. On the 28th of February, the Vanderbilt, afte, fell in with the Wachusett off St. Thomas. Wilkes thereupon left the Wachusett, and transferring[6 more...]
mand of naval defences of Virginia, 76; sinks Merrimac. 78 Texas, blockade and coast of, 46 Torpedoes, invention and early history of, 3 et seq. Tredegar Iron Works, 22, 54 Trent, the, 177 et seq. Tuscaloosa, the, 199 et seq. Union, the, blockades Savannah, 85 Vanderbilt, the, 77, 203 et seq. Vincennes, the, 128, 130 et seq. Wachusett, the, captures the Florida, 188, 202 Ward, Commodore, Jas. H., 85 et seq.; killed, 88 Water Witch, the, 122, 128 et seq. Weehawken, the, captures the Atlanta, 117 et seq. Westfield, the, 143, 144 (note); 146 et seq.; destroyed, 150 Wilkes, Captain, 140; seizes Mason and Slidell, 177 et seq. Wilkes, Captain, Chas., commands flying squadron, 201; relieved of command, 203 et seq. Wilmington, 85, 87 et seq.; harbor of, 91, 92 et seq. Winslow, Lieutenant, Francis, 128 et seq., 135 Worden, Lieutenant John L., commands Monitor, 56, 67 et seq.; wounded, 71, 75 (note); commands Montauk, 216 Wyalusing, the, 99