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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 311 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 100 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 94 8 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 74 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 68 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 54 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John Adams or search for John Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
at early daylight. The troops having embarked in the creek and passed into the Coosaw, through the Brick-yard Creek to the first landing, at 8 A. M., the first detachment landed on Chisholm's Island with two light navy howitzers and their crews, under cover of the gunboats that had in the meantime come up. The landing was made on the north bank of the Coosaw, four miles below the ferry. The embarked troops and the naval force then proceeded to the second point of debarkation, higher up at Adams's plantation, where they arrived at 10 A. M. At that point the gunboats anchored, and they and the launches covered the debarkation, during which time Commander Rodgers went on board of the Hale, and to within range of the battery of the enemy at Port Royal Ferry, on Chisholm's Island, into which shells were thrown. This fire dislodged troops lying in an adjoining field, but no response came from the battery. At 1.30 P. M. the troops moved toward Port Royal Ferry, the gunboats and launch
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
by 10 A. M., those on board of the De Ford and the Paul Jones having landed on arrival. At the request of General Brannan the Uncas proceeded up the Pocotaligo River and the Patroon and the Vixen up the Coosawhatchie, the last-named to cover the landing of Colonel Barton's forces from the Planter. The services of these vessels are officially commended. Also at the request of the general, the three howitzers of the Wabash, in charge of Lieutenant Phenix and Ensigns Wallace, Pearson, and Adams, were landed and sent to the front; the conduct of these officers and the men under their command was highly commended by the general commanding the troops. A message from the general that he was falling back was received at 5 P. M. The next day (23d) the troops re-embarked and the whole force returned to Port Royal. The escape of the picket was in itself sufficient to make the move abortive, and the failure of the vessels to arrive for five hours after those leading, was also enough, as t
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
he sea from the sound. The boat being launched in the inland waters, Ensign Cony started with orders to capture or destroy anything that might be of use to the enemy. A Confederate 12-pound howitzer was stationed near that locality, and Captain Adams, in charge, had come down to the schooner with it, having seen the smoke-stack of the Shokokon over the thicket. A lookout at the masthead of the schooner was peering toward the sea entrance, while the Shokokon's boat came in the opposite diithout being discovered; one of the dingy's crew crawled into the camp, counted the men, and returning, made his report. A charge was ordered and our seven men bore down on the enemy with a shout. Ten prisoners were secured, among whom were Captains Adams and Latham, one 12-pounder army howitzer, eighteen horses, one schooner, and the salt works. Two men were thrown out as pickets, two detailed to guard the prisoners, and with the aid of the other two men Ensign Cony burned the vessel and sal
Index. A. Adams, Captain, 198 Adams, Ensign, 72 Adams, plantation of, 44 Adelaide, the U. S. transport, 165 Africa, U. S. ships on coast of, 7 Agassiz, the, 197 Alabama, the, Confederate vessel, 74, 228 Albatross, theAdams, Ensign, 72 Adams, plantation of, 44 Adelaide, the U. S. transport, 165 Africa, U. S. ships on coast of, 7 Agassiz, the, 197 Alabama, the, Confederate vessel, 74, 228 Albatross, the, 66 Albemarle, the, 200, 203 et seq. Aldridge, Mate, 237 Allen, Chief Engineer, 143 Allen, Lieutenant-Commander, 237 Allen, Mr., 34 America, the, 61 Ames, General, 241 Ammen, Lieutenant-Commanding Daniel, 21; at Fort McAAdams, plantation of, 44 Adelaide, the U. S. transport, 165 Africa, U. S. ships on coast of, 7 Agassiz, the, 197 Alabama, the, Confederate vessel, 74, 228 Albatross, the, 66 Albemarle, the, 200, 203 et seq. Aldridge, Mate, 237 Allen, Chief Engineer, 143 Allen, Lieutenant-Commander, 237 Allen, Mr., 34 America, the, 61 Ames, General, 241 Ammen, Lieutenant-Commanding Daniel, 21; at Fort McAllister, 87; off Charleston, 92, 160, 162 (note) Anderson, Colonel R. H., 85 (note) Andrews, Major, 169 Arey, Master, 220 Aries, the, 229 Armstrong, of the Georgia, 194 Arrow, the Confederate steamer, 211 Atlanta, the Confedera. Jacksonville, Fla., 60 et seq. James Adger, the, 84 Jeffers, Lieutenant-Commanding William N., 177, 186 John Adams, the, U. S. sloop, 7 Johnson, Ensign M. L., conduct commended, 62; again commended, 102 Johnson, Neils, 69 Jo