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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 157 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 142 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 112 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 68 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 49 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for T. W. Sherman or search for T. W. Sherman in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
s were also the numerous steam transports carrying some 12,000 men, under the command of General T. W. Sherman, with provisions and army outfits of all kinds. A steamer called the Governor, suitablead left to Dupont the selection of the point of attack, to be agreed upon, however, with General T. W. Sherman, whose orders, dated August 2, 1861, are as follows: You will proceed to New York immediafterward in passing to the northward the Wabash and Susquehanna gave it some shells. General T. W. Sherman, commanding our troops of the Port Royal expedition, in his report of November 8th, says smaller navy vessels imposed quiet upon them for a time. On the afternoon of the 8th General T. W. Sherman made a reconnoissance several miles up the Beaufort River on board of the Seneca. Lumpsy in the Confederate camps. Apprised of this intended movement on the part of the enemy, General Sherman sent to Flag-Officer Dupont a confidential letter, stating that the time had come for actio
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
he channel. They anchored and despatched boats from the different vessels to examine numerous creeks and the upper part of the river. At 5 P. M. five Confederate steamers, one bearing the flag of Commodore Tatnall, came to anchor at the upper end of St. Augustine's Creek. The telegraph wire was seen on the marsh between Savannah and Fort Pulaski, and was cut. General Wright and others made careful examination as to the advantage of a military occupation of Wilmington Island, to which General Sherman had directed his attention. At 11.15 A. M. of the following day (28th), five Confederate vessels attempted to pass down the Savannah River to Fort Pulaski, with scows in tow. A force of gunboats under Commander John Rodgers, then in Wright River, on the opposite side of the Savannah, and the force under Captain Davis opened fire on the enemy, which was returned with spirit. The flag-ship and another steamer of the enemy were sufficiently affected by the fire to put about; the other
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
ovember, 1864, General Foster asked navy cooperation in an attack to assist the movement of General Sherman. For this purpose a force of 500 men was organized and placed under Commander George H. Prything was effected by the movement, it was in diverting a force from opposing the march of General Sherman to the sea. On the 11th the admiral left the Tulifiny, and the following day reported the presence of General Sherman's troops near Savannah. His occupation of that city on the 22d practically ended all naval operations that were not auxiliary to the movements of the army, except that of blockade. Rainy weather held the Union army fast until January 24th. General Sherman was then at Beaufort, S. C., with the right wing, which some time before had been sent in transports from Savops of the enemy from concentrating, and to perplex him as to what were the actual movements of Sherman's army. In order to aid an army diversion on Bull's Bay, eighteen miles north of Charleston
hat lodged in the wheel of the Osceola blew the wheelhouse to pieces and knocked down bulkheads inboard, but did not damage the hull. The following morning fishing-nets were spread across the river above the vessels to intercept torpedoes. The army had also engaged Fort Strong. The admiral closes by saying that he had the pleasure of hoisting the Union flag over it, and that day being the anniversary of the birth of Washington, at noon would fire a national salute. No hostile gun was thereafter fired between Wilmington and the sea, but higher up, where the army of General Sherman was yet to pass, the war was not yet over. Some of the smaller vessels of the navy ascended the river as a supporting force as high as Fayetteville, and found sunk, as a channel obstruction, the Confederate privateer Chickamauga. A national salute, reverberating over the navigable waters of Cape Fear River, now restored to national authority, seemed a fitting close to nearly four years of civil war.
in many cases to distinguish those serving in Southeastern Virginia and Petersburg from those in North Carolina. Vii—Abstract from returns of the United States military forces serving in the Department of the South, from January, 1862, to January, 1805. compiled from original returns. Date.Present for duty in department.Aggregate in South Carolina and Georgia.Aggregate present in Florida.Aggregate present in department.Commanding general. January 31, 186214,19716,28416,284Gen. T. W. Sherman, of the Expeditionary Corps, to March 31, 1862. February 28, 186216,49517,87517,875 March 31, 186216,49515,257272117,978 April 30, 186215,00015,7951,19416,989Major-Gen. D. Hunter, from March 31 to Sept. 5, 1862. May 20, 186319,21915,8787,41223,290 June 30, 186218,74516,5315,09921,630 July 31, 186213,24911,1705,02916,199 August 31, 186210,48710,4242,31712,741 September 30, 18629,9259,0933,47812,571Bg.-Gen. J. M. Brannan, from Sept. 5 to Sept. 15, 1862. October 31, 186210,19010,
seq., 28; report on defence of Forts Walker and Beauregard, 31 et seq.; his coast chart found, 34, 114 Duncan, Commander, Jesse, 142 Dupont, Flag-Officer, Samuel Francis, 13 et seq., 16 et seq., 26, 38; receives a confidential letter from Sherman, 43; reports of, 53 et seq.; report of, 60 et seq., 65, 70; letter to, concerning Beauregard's proclamation, 78 et seq., 83; before Fort McAlister, 85, 87; off Charleston, 91, 100 et seq.; conflicting orders to, 104 et seq.; relieved of command,, 21, 28 et seq., 49 Semmes, Lieutenant-Commanding A. A., 64 Seymour, the, 181, 183, 205 Sharpe, Lieutenant, 170 Shawmut, the, 242 Shawsheen the, 177, 181, 183, 186, 194, 196 et seq. Shenandoah, the, 156, 217, 228 Sherman, General T. W., 14, 17 (note); his report on Port Royal expedition, 32 et seq.; moves against Port Royal Ferry, 43, 47, 59, 152 et seq.; 242 et seq. Shokokon, the, 196 Shuttleworth, Captain, 166 Simms, Mate, 237 Sketches: of the Atlanta, 119;