Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) or search for Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: raid of the Confederate ironclads off Charles-Ton.—attack on Fort M'Allister. (search)
e had injured the pilot-house of the ram and shot away her flag-staff. The rams entered Charleston Harbor, and were not seen until late in the afternoon, when the mist partially lifted and showed them at anchor in the Maffitt Channel, near Fort Moultrie, visible from the assigned anchorage of the Housatonic. The following proclamation was issued: Headquarters naval and land forces, Charleston, S. C., January 31, 1863. At the hour of five o'clock this morning the Confederate Statl for repairs. The Unadilla returned to her usual anchorage, after communicating with the senior officer, where she remained during the day. Throughout the day two small tug-boats remained apparently in attendance on the rams, under cover of Forts Moultrie and Beauregard. The prize steamer Princess Royal, which had been lying alongside of the Housatonic, was despatched to Port Royal, by order of the senior officer, one hour and a half after the ram had returned to the cover of the batteries an
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. (search)
reased the accuracy of fire from the forts as the vessels passed. As the narrow part of the channel was approached, the flood tide became strong, setting the vessels in, and made them additionally unmanageable. Soon after getting within the heavy fire of the batteries, the Weehawken signalled obstructions in her vicinity, and previous to that a torpedo had exploded close to her; Captain Rodgers' report states: We approached very close to the obstructions extending from Fort Sumter to Fort Moultrie—as near, indeed, as I could get without running upon them. They were marked by rows of casks very near together. To the eye they appeared almost to touch one another, and there was more than one line of them. The appearance was so formidable that, upon deliberate judgment, I thought it right not to entangle the vessel in obstructions which I did not think we could have passed through, and in which we should have been caught. Beyond these, piles were seen between Castle Pinckney and
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
in a distance of about four hundred and fifty yards of Wagner, and the Ironsides as near as her draught would permit. After a couple of hours the fort was silenced, and the fire of the vessels was less frequent thereafter. During the action Fort Moultrie made fair practice on the Ironsides. The batteries of General Gillmore were working effectively on the gorge of Sumter. Later in the day the admiral shifted his flag to the Passaic, and, accompanied by the Patapsco, steamed to within two ight, and an army boat from Morris Island hoisted the flag over Moultrie. About 9 A. M. the Canonicus sent a boat and took possession of a small steamboat, a blockade-runner, under English colors, that had been on shore for several days near Fort Moultrie. The admiral reports that upon the evacuation of Charleston, he found the ram Columbia, which had been ready for service on January 12th, and grounding coming out of dock, had been seriously strained through lying on uneven bottom. Her le
ards ; of Ironsides to Moultrie, 1,700 yards, and to Sumter, 2,000 yards. Iii—return of guns and mortars at forts and batteries in Charleston Harbor engaged with the ironclads, April 1, 1863, together with return of ammunition expended, and statement of casualties. Fort or Battery.X-in. Columbiad.Ix-in. Dahlgren.Vii-in. Brooke rifle.Viii-in. Columbiad.42-pounder, rifled.32-pounder, rifled.32-pdr., smooth.X-in. mortars.Grand total. Fort Johnson11 Fort Sumter42287113744 Fort Moultrie955221 Battery Bee516 Battery Beauregard112 Battery Cumming's Point112 Battery Wagner11 ————————— Total10321978181077 ————————— Ammunition—Shot3858086731140321343 Shell54593 Total shot and shell2,229 Total pounds of powder21,093 Casualties in action3 killed, 11 wounded. Number of shots fired by fleet151 Number of shots struck vessels520 Of shots fired by fleet, all but 24 were directed at Sumter. note.—This information is comp
48 et seq. Fingal, the, 120 Fisher, Signal Officer, 178 Fisher, Fort, see Fort Fisher. Flag, the, U. S. steamer, 81 Flusser, Lieutenant-Commanding C. W., 177, 184 189, 194, 199 et seq. Foote, Admiral, 122 Forrest, the, Confederate steamer, 185 Fort Beauregard, 22, 27; abandoned, 28 et seq., 101 Fort Clinch, desertion of, 50 et seq. Fort Donelson, the, 229 Fort Fisher, 217, 219 et seq. Fort Jackson, the, 218, 228 Fort McAllister, 85 et seq. Fort Moultrie, 4, 91 et seq., 131 et seq., 134, 137, 146 et seq., 151, 156, 165 Fort Pulaski, surrender of, 61 et seq. Fort Sumter, S. C., 2, 4 et seq., 11, 16; attack on, 90 et seq., 130 et seq., 141, 146, 148 Fort Wagner, 126 et seq., 131, 133 et seq., 145 Fort Walker, attack on, 22 et seq.; surrender pf, 27; report on, 30 et seq., 42 Foster, Captain I. L., 179 Foster, General, 149, 152, 196 et seq. Fox, Gustavus V., Assistant Sec. of the Navy, 10, 121, 162 Frailey, Comma