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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 158 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 105 3 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 68 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 62 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) or search for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
f not impossible, is at least a slow and difficult operation. To go around Cape Hatteras to Hampton Roads in order to coal, as had been the case, hundreds of miles from the blockaded ports, lessenedet of purchased vessels, ferry-boats, and freight steamers of small size, were despatched to Hampton Roads as soon as fitted, and the flag-ship, accompanied by the vessels of war proper, including foch pivot guns on board of the gunboats were found handy and effective within their range. Hampton Roads at that time was crowded with vessels of war, transports, and coaling schooners. Those destd only in the event of separation—this motley force, numbering fifty vessels, steamed out of Hampton Roads on the morning of the 29th of October. There was considerable delay in forming a double ech The gunboats behaved well, which had been doubted from their motions in rough water when in Hampton Roads. Throughout the night, which was very dark, the driven drops of rain struck the face roug
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
f storms in winter, neither the vessels of war, as they were somewhat inaptly termed, if compared with vessels built for the purpose, nor the transports for the troops, often unseaworthy, stood on the order of their coming. Happily for them, Hampton Roads was only one hundred and fifty miles distant, but on arriving off the inlet vessels that had been chartered not to draw more than twelve feet were found of heavier draught, and some of them hammered to pieces on the bar, and many of the navalaught in general, began crossing, and by the 23d all of them that had arrived up to that time were over the bulkhead. The Whitehall, in getting across the outer bar, or within the inlet from the sea, was so injured that she had to be sent to Hampton Roads for repairs. Not before the 22d of January had General Burnside made any considerable progress in getting the army transports over the bulkhead, and from the facts above stated, the last naval vessel was delayed until the 28th of January,
nd making a thorough reconnoissance of Fort Fisher, both General Weitzel and myself are fully of the opinion that the place could not be carried by assault, as it was left substantially uninjured as a defensive work by the navy fire. We found seventeen guns protected by traverses, two only of which were dismounted, bearing up the beach, and covering a strip of land, the only practicable route, not more than wide enough for a thousand men in line of battle. ... I shall therefore sail for Hampton Roads as soon as the transport fleet can be got in order. My engineers and officers report Fort Fisher to me as substantially uninjured as a defensive work. The bombardment of this day was of about seven hours duration. A few guns near the Mound battery kept up a fire on the vessels, and at intervals there was some firing from guns nearer the ironclads and line of frigates. Everything was coolly and systematically done, and the admiral adds, I witnessed some fine practice. The weath
rant, General U. S., 215, 227 Graves, Master G. W., 177, 189 Great Britain, opinions there on the destruction of Charleston Harbor, 41 et seq.; statement purported from her consul at Charleston, 78 et seq.; English steamers attempt blockade-running, 146; blockade-runner taken, 146 Green, Mate, 237 Gregory. Rear-Admiral, 110, 122 Griffin. Colonel, 199 Guss, Colonel, 50 H. Haggerty, Commander Francis S., 21 Hale, the, U. S. tug, 43 et seq., 48, 63 et seq., 70 Hampton Roads, expedition to, 13 et seq. Harriet Lane, the U. S. revenue cutter, 165 et seq. Harris, Ensign, 237 Harris, Lieutenant-Commander T. C., 128 Hartford, the, U. S. steamer, 7 Harvest Moon, the, U. S. steamer, 148, 159 Hatch, General, 152 et seq. Hatteras Inlet, 163 et seq. Hatteras, the, U. S. vessel, 74 Hawkins, Colonel, 165, 172, 187, 194 Hayes, Acting-Master, Peter, 177, 189 Hazard, Commander Samuel F., 177 Hazeltine, Ensign, 147 Henningsen, General