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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
to make a general attack but to invest the works as closely as he could with safety. (See his report on page 159 of the volume quoted above, in which the reports of officers of both armies will be found.) About ten o'clock on the morning of the 13th, General Buckner says, the enemy made a vigorous attack on Hanson's position, but was repelled with heavy loss. The attack was subsequently renewed by three heavy regiments, but was again repulsed by the Second Kentucky regiment, aided by a part y the arrival of Gen. Lew Wallace's division, about 7,000 strong, from Fort Henry. The disposition of his army was as follows: Mc-Clernand's division on the right, Wallace's in the center and Smith's on the left. Meantime the weather had, on the 13th, turned very cold, with snow and rain which bore heavily upon the Confederate troops exposed in the trenches and already worn down by incessant duty for three days and nights. It became evident to the Confederate commanders that to remain inact
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
r of Cincinnati, being notified, said he would send 500 men, and the governor of Ohio 1,000 stand of arms, while the governor of Indiana said he would send a regiment. All this telegraphing took place on the 12th. The scare increased. On the 13th General Boyle telegraphed Capt. Oliver D. Greene, Buell's assistant adjutant-general: Morgan's force is increasing. The rebels are rising in the counties on the Ohio. The State will be under the domination of Morgan in a few days. He will take battalion under Major Smith, and two companies of Kentuckians under Capts. W. J. Taylor and Waltham, increasing his force to 1,400. Resting until 1p. m. on the 12th he marched for Murfreesboro, fifty miles, and arrived there at 4:30 a. m. on the 13th, capturing the pickets without firing a gun. The Federal forces were under the command of Gen. T. T. Crittenden, of Indiana, and consisted of portions of the Ninth Michigan infantry, Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry, Third Minnesota infantry and Capt.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ed only with hard fighting and must be sustained by constant reinforcements. He trusts that Gen. S. B. Buckner will be sent with his column, as there is not a single Kentuckian of influence or a single Kentucky regiment with the command. On the 13th he addressed his last communication to General Bragg before leaving for the front, saying, I leave here to-night and will be at Big Creek Gap Friday (16th). On Saturday night I will cross the mountains by Rogers' Gap with four brigades of infantryn S. Scott, with a force of 869 men, styled the Kirby Smith brigade, composed of the First Louisiana cavalry, Lieut.--Col. Jas. O. Nixon; the First Georgia cavalry, Col. J. J. Morrison, and the Buckner Guards, Captain Garnett, left Kingston on the 13th, moved via Jamestown, Tenn., Monticello and Somerset, Ky., and at 7 o'clock a. m. on the 17th captured London, Ky., taking 111 prisoners and a large number of wagons loaded with quartermaster and commissary stores destined for Cumberland Gap. On
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
g men accompanied him, that he would secure possession of Nashville by a direct advance upon that place or by maneuvering Buell out of it. Adopting the latter plan he moved from Sparta on the 7th, by the very route indicated in his letter to General Breckinridge August 27th, in the direction of Glasgow, Ky., his right wing crossing the Tennessee at Gainesboro and the left wing at Carthage; and marching upon converging lines, arrived at Glasgow with the former on the 12th and the latter on the 13th. General Bragg remained at Glasgow until the afternoon of the 15th to rest his troops and replenish subsistence and forage supply, as he had started from Chattanooga with but ten days rations, which had been depleted before leaving Sparta. He had on his arrival at Glasgow occupied Cave City with the brigades of Generals J. R. Chalmers and J. K. Duncan, thus cutting the railroad between Bowling Green and Louisville. General Buell had in the meantime advanced to Bowling Green, 30 miles ne