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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
ponds calmly that General Buell's position is such that he cannot deplete his force; and then he drolly telegraphs General Halleck, then at Tuscumbia, Ala.: They are having a stampede in Kentucky. Please look to it. Thus it went on until General Morgan took his leave, and then on the 20th, General Boyle telegraphs Buell, I do not believe now that he had over 1,000 or 1,200 men. They were again veritable men in buckram. When Morgan is well out of reach, he telegraphs General Buell on the 23d, I shall issue orders that guerrillas and armed squads are to be shot and not taken prisoners. I shall seize horses of secessionists to mount my men and at proper time require them to pay for Union men's property stolen and destroyed. A few days before he had said, I shall publish an order forbidding secessionists standing for office. The State election was to be held on the first Monday in August. General Buell responds on the 24th: I approve of punishing the guilty, but it will not answe
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
cott, with a force of 869 men, styled the Kirby Smith brigade, composed of the First Louisiana cavalry, Lieut.--Col. Jas. O. Nixon; the First Georgia cavalry, Col. J. J. Morrison, and the Buckner Guards, Captain Garnett, left Kingston on the 13th, moved via Jamestown, Tenn., Monticello and Somerset, Ky., and at 7 o'clock a. m. on the 17th captured London, Ky., taking 111 prisoners and a large number of wagons loaded with quartermaster and commissary stores destined for Cumberland Gap. On the 23d he attacked Col. Leonidas Metcalfe, of the Seventh Kentucky cavalry, at Big Hill, seventeen miles from Richmond, and routed him with heavy loss, then pursuing the enemy in disorderly flight nearly to Richmond. Meantime General Smith, following the line of operations indicated in his letter to President Davis of the 11th, crossed the Cumberland mountains through Rogers' Gap, with the divisions of Cleburne and Churchill 6,000 strong, and on the 18th reached Barboursville, Ky., while General H
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
train of supplies, and while keeping an eye on Gen. Geo. W. Morgan, to dispose his forces with a view to early concentration at Bardstown for a movement on Louisville. The messages were delivered within forty-eight hours and immediate steps were taken accordingly. General Bragg, having attempted but failed to draw General Buell to an attack, and knowing that he could reach the Ohio river by a practical route further west, began his movement to Bardstown on the 20th and reached there on the 23rd. After a few days spent there, leaving General Polk in command of the army, he made a tour of inspection through Danville via Springfield and Perryville to Lexington, and thence to Frankfort, where, on October 4th, Hon. Richard Hawes, who had been chosen by the council provisional governor to succeed Gov. George W. Johnson, killed at Shiloh, was inaugurated in form. The greater part of General Smith's army was then in the vicinity of the capital. In the meantime General Buell, whose arm
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
d that it was impossible to invade East Tennessee at that time on account of the barren country, the approach of winter and bad roads; besides that, a prompt return to Nashville was necessary in order to hold any part of Tennessee. On the 9th Halleck telegraphed: I am directed by the President to say that your army must enter East Tennessee this fall and that it ought to move there while the roads are passable. Buell, however, continued the movement of his army toward Nashville, and on the 23d General Rosecrans, at Corinth, Miss., was directed to repair to Cincinnati to receive orders. Upon his arrival there on the 28th, he received notification of his appointment to the department of the Cumberland, being the State of Tennessee east of the Tennessee river and the parts of north Alabama and Georgia in possession of the United States troops. He was directed to exhibit this instruction to General Buell and assume command of his forces. On the 30th General Rosecrans presented his c