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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
, September 29th, by Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, of the Federal army. Kentucky, again secure in the occupation of the Federal troops, passed into a new and more complete state of subjugation. Not only were those who had shown their sympathy for the Confederates during their occupation made to feel the hand of power, but soon Union men who ventured to dissent from the extreme policy of the administration were treated as rebels and subjected to equal indignity. The most radical and revolutionary element obtained control, and a reign of terror was soon inaugurated which, subsequently continued through the war under Burnside, Burbridge, Payne and Palmer, not only intensified the Southern sympathy, but finally alienated a large majority of those who had originally been the most pronounced Unionists. But it was too late to be of practical benefit to the cause of the South, and save with an occasional cavalry raid, the soil of Kentucky did not again feel the tread of the contending armies.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
took a position fifty miles eastward where he was free from further molestation. Here General Breckinridge's division remained until August 26th, when it was ordered to Chattanooga, which had now become the storm center in the West. General Rosecrans, pending the military operations in the southwest, and his own preparations for a general advance, had long remained quiescent. About the 20th of June he gave evidence of a positive advance, both with his own army and one commanded by General Burnside, into East Tennessee. An extensive cavalry raid was made here by Colonel Carter, who approached the vicinity of Knoxville, and burned several bridges on the East Tennessee & Virginia railroad. On the 23rd of June General Rosecrans captured Hoover's Gap and General Bragg fell back gradually to Chattanooga, when the situation became very similar to that of a year previous, when General Buell on the right and Gen. Geo. W. Morgan on the left seemed on the point of success. But the waste
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
months of July and August. Rosecrans, declining a direct attack, projected a heavy movement up Will's valley on the western side of Lookout mountain, threatening Rome and Bragg's communications, thus forcing the evacuation of Chattanooga on the 9th day of September, Bragg's object being by a coup to crush the right wing of Rosecrans' army, which was moving into Georgia through the gaps south of Chattanooga, and then to turn suddenly upon its left, which occupied the city. Meanwhile, General Burnside having advanced into east Tennessee from Kentucky, General Buckner had evacuated Knoxville on the 25th of August, and joined Bragg with his division, commanded by General Preston, who with the Fifth Kentucky and some other troops came from southwest Virginia to reinforce General Bragg. Buckner was then placed in command of a corps consisting of the divisions of Gen. A. P. Stewart and General Preston, the latter embracing the troops of General Buckner's department, composed of Gracie's
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
agg moved up to within cannon-shot of Chattanooga, where Rosecrans, reassured by the failure of pursuit and the strength of the defenses which Bragg had constructed, suspended his movements for retreat inaugurated in the Federal panic, and settled down to stand a siege. Bragg disposed his army in the valley between Missionary Ridge and Point Lookout, from which latter elevation every movement in the beleaguered town was distinctly visible. He remained there until November 25th. Meanwhile Burnside had captured Knoxville, and Longstreet was sent to dislodge him, but was foiled, after a desperate assault on the strong fortifications, and the greater part of East Tennessee was permanently lost to the Confederacy. At the same time Federal reinforcements poured into Chattanooga, and General Grant, full of the prestige of Vicksburg and looming up into the prominence which soon placed him at the head of the Federal armies, was sent to restore the shattered confidence of Rosecrans' army.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
ful pursuit of a livelihood. The condition was changed from that which prevailed at the time of the Federal occupation, and during the war its scourge and the oppression of the satraps who had successfully exercised a despotic sway, had changed the whole current of political feeling. Men who had been prominent in handing over the State to Federal domination and had favored the hanging of so-called secessionists, had been sent to Northern prisons for protesting against the oppression of Burnside, Burbridge and Palmer, while Garrett Davis, who had succeeded Breckinridge in the Senate as a reward for his services in shackling the State, was as severe against the administration at Washington as his predecessor had been four years before, and was as roundly denounced as an arch-rebel. In fact the State was as ready for revolt under the leadership of those once most loyal as it had ever been under the State rights domination. So that instead of coming home to be disciplined the Sout
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix A. (search)
n, of Louisville, State printer. An ordinance of secession was adopted, and Henry C. Burnett, William E. Simms and William Preston were sent as commissioners to Richmond, and on the 10th day of December, 1862, the Confederate Congress admitted Kentucky as a member of the Confederate States. Bowling Green was made the new seat of government. The following executive council was chosen: Willis B. Machen, president; John W. Crockett, Philip B. Thompson, James P. Bates, James S. Chrisman, Elijah Burnside, H. W. Bruce, E. M. Bruce, James M. Thorn, and Geo. B. Hodge, who resigned and was succeeded by Samuel S. Scott. 1 The following were elected representatives in the Provisional Congress from the several districts: First, Henry C. Burnett; Second, John Thomas; Third, Theodore L. Burnett; Fourth, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth, Daniel P. White; Sixth, Thomas Johnson; Seventh, Samuel H. Ford; Eighth, Thomas B. Monroe, Sr; Ninth, John M. Elliott; Tenth, Geo. B. Hodge. The council divided the St
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
d Forty-fifth Virginia infantry, the Eighth Virginia cavalry, Bailey's and Edgar's battalions and the light batteries of artillery of Captains Otey and Lowry. On April 16, 1862, he was commissioned as brigadier-general. He served under Humphrey Marshall in eastern Kentucky and southwest Virginia. After the removal of General Marshall to another field of operations General Williams remained in east Tennessee, and in September, 1863, took command of the department, opposing the advance of Burnside to the best of his ability. In November, at his own request, General Williams was relieved of his command and Col. Henry L. Giltner took charge of the brigade. General Williams continued, however, to operate in this region, and in September of 1864 helped to defeat the attack of General Burbridge upon the salt works near Abingdon, Va. He was serving under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston when the surrender took place. Going back to his home after the return of peace, he used all his influence tow