Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Cave City (Kentucky, United States) or search for Cave City (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
vice with a temporary organization, which was not completed until some time afterward. Its officers became Thomas H. Hunt, colonel; J. W. Caldwell, lieutenant-colonel; J. C. Wickliffe, major; Henry W. Gray, A. Q. M. The captains were, John W. Caldwell, J. C. Wickliffe, William Mitchell, Ben Desha, Geo. A. King, James T. Morehead, Chris Bosche and J. R. Bright. The Sixth, Lewis' regiment, was raised by Col. Jos. H. Lewis, of Glasgow, Ky., under similar circumstances to the foregoing, at Cave City, and organized as follows: Joseph H. Lewis, colonel; Martin H. Cofer, of Elizabethtown, lieutenant-colonel; Thomas H. Hays, of Hardin county, major; David C. Walker, A. Q. M.; John F. Davis, A. C. S.; R. S. Stevenson, surgeon, and H. H. Kavanagh, Jr., chaplain. The captains were, C. B. McClaskey, Geo. B. Maxson, Isaac Smith, D. E. Mc-Kendree, D. P. Barclay, W. W. Bagby, Granville Utterback, W. Lee Harned, Samuel B. Crewdson, John G. Jones. The command designated as Cofer's regiment in
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
Tennessee cavalry) in the direction of Glasgow, which place I reached at 12 o'clock that night. There were but few troops in the town, who fled at our approach. The commissary stores, clothing, etc., together with a large supply of medical stores found in Glasgow, were burned, and the guns were distributed among my command, about 200 of which were unarmed when I left Knoxville. From Glasgow I proceeded along the main Lexington road to Barren [Green] river, halting for a short time near Cave City, my object being to induce the belief that I intended destroying the railroad bridge between Bowling Green and Woodsonville. I caused wires connecting with the portable battery that I carried with me to be attached to the telegraph line near Horse Cave and intercepted a number of dispatches. At Barren [Green] river, I detached three companies under Capt. Jack Allen to move forward rapidly and destroy the Salt river bridge, that the troops along the line of the railroad might be prevente
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
e supply, as he had started from Chattanooga with but ten days rations, which had been depleted before leaving Sparta. He had on his arrival at Glasgow occupied Cave City with the brigades of Generals J. R. Chalmers and J. K. Duncan, thus cutting the railroad between Bowling Green and Louisville. General Buell had in the meantimhis untoward event, as well as to deprive the enemy of this formidable stronghold, moved out from Glasgow on the afternoon of the 15th, General Hardee's corps to Cave City, and General Polk's upon the Bear Wallow road, which crosses the Green river some distance above Munfordville and is the most direct road toward Lexington. On t Station, in presence of the Confederate army drawn up in line along the road for the ceremony. They were then marched to the rear, escorted in the direction of Cave City, and paroled. The captured garrison numbered about four thousand, with ten pieces of artillery and a proportionate quantity of ammunition, horses, mules and mil
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
vicinity, not more than forty miles from Murfreesboro, and in possession of the country to within ten or twelve miles of it, for more than five months. About ten days before the battle of Murfreesboro Gen. John H. Morgan started on one of his celebrated raids against Rosecrans' communications in Kentucky, which, had General Braggwon a decisive battle, would have been very disastrous in its results. He moved by his well-beaten path to Glasgow, Ky., encountering opposition there and at Cave City, but crossing Green river did great damage along the railroad from Bacon Creek bridge to Elizabethtown, where he captured six hundred prisoners, and made a circuit by way of Springfield and Columbia to Burkesville, where he crossed the Cumberland on the 2nd. Notwithstanding the severe weather, hard marching and fighting, his loss was but two killed, twenty-four wounded and sixty-four missing, while he captured 1,877 prisoners, with a large amount of stores and arms, and diverted the atten