hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 121 21 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 32 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 4 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Napoleon (Arkansas, United States) or search for Napoleon (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 7 document sections:

Chapter 5: The Federals occupy Batesville General Hindman assigned to the Trans-Mississederates. May 4th, the Federal army reached Batesville, on White river, near its junction with the Tenn.), who had espoused the Union cause. Batesville is the seat of Independence county, one of tnetrated at will into the region adjacent to Batesville, and into the counties bordering on MissouriTories formed a Federal Arkansas regiment at Batesville, and a brigade in Madison, Carroll and Newtopinion not more than half that number) is at Batesville and Jacksonport, moving to this place and va Gen. Samuel R. Curtis, with headquarters at Batesville, head of the army of the Southwest and by auenemy by threatening his communications with Batesville. Capt. Joseph Fry executed these orders wit to Little Red river, and thence marched to Batesville. These operations gave me a good line of deing a telegraph station a few miles north of Batesville, with the telegraphic correspondence of Curt[3 more...]
r, Major Kirtley, and others. From Hazlewood the Confederates returned to Batesville, Ark., January 18, 1863. Carroll's Arkansas brigade, commanded by Col. J. C. Mo General Curtis. Johnson's statement was that he was stopped by Marmaduke at Batesville, February 1st, who admitted him to a conversation with Colonel Ponder and himColonel Newton's scouts captured in Missouri Hon. Elisha Baxter, a citizen of Batesville, brother of John Baxter of Knoxville, Tenn. Elisha Baxter had been a merchant at Batesville, but studied law and was elected as a Whig to the legislature. He favored all measures looking to the perpetuation of the Union, and upon the beginnin a Union man, but declined the appointment tendered him by General Curtis, at Batesville, of commander of the First Arkansas (Federal) regiment, there organized. On General Price was at Jacksonport, in the rich valley of White river, below Batesville, June 8th, when General Holmes addressed him a note asking If we could with p
Fourche duel between Marmaduke and Walker evacuation of Little Rock. Major-General Curtis, commander of the Federal department of Missouri, wrote, on May 12, 1863, to Major-General Halleck, commanderin-chief at Washington: At such a crisis, east, west and everywhere, I will not trouble you with details in this department. Reliable information, just received, satisfies me that the enemy west of the Mississippi is located as follows: Near Little Rock, under General Price, 11,000; near Batesville, under Marmaduke and others, 8,000; in the region of Fort Smith, including rebel Indians, under General Cabell and others, 4,000. . . . A move up White river now would separate Marmaduke and Price, and totally dishearten all the rebels in Missouri, Arkansas and everywhere west of the Mississippi. I think a junction could be formed between forces now at Helena and General Herron's force (army of the Frontier), now massing west of Pilot Knob, and thereby complete the discomfiture of every r
f camp life with the infantry, obtained orders to scout and recruit a cavalry command in White and adjoining counties, along White river, and speedily organized a force of 300 men, with which he met and skirmished with Livingston's rangers from Batesville at Lunenburg, killing Captain Baxter, Fourth Arkansas (Federal) infantry; took possession of Jacksonport a few days afterward, and held the south side of Red river. McRae, Freeman and James Rutherford made life irksome for the Federal commandeapturing a number of prominent rebels. Galloway learned on the 26th that a detachment of Missouri cavalry bearing dispatches from General Sanborn had been attacked and 11 men killed by Col. Tom Freeman's men. The defeat of Colonel Freeman near Batesville, and the pursuit of Colonel Witt across the Arkansas river below Clarksville, were also reported. Returning to Crooked creek and Rolling prairie, in Marion, Galloway told of pursuing a force of 300, killing and capturing a number, and about Du
age of the Arkansas at Dardanelle. Landing safely on the opposite bank on May 18th, he passed through Dover and Clinton to White river, scattering the bands of Federals and jayhawkers that came in his way, crossed White river 20 miles west of Batesville, and remained between Batesville and Jacksonport to recruit his horses and the numerical strength of his army. On the 23d of June, scouting in the vicinity of Clarenden, he found the gunboat Queen City lying off the place. His description of Batesville and Jacksonport to recruit his horses and the numerical strength of his army. On the 23d of June, scouting in the vicinity of Clarenden, he found the gunboat Queen City lying off the place. His description of the capture is in the following characteristic strain: Placing pickets on every road, and arresting every man, woman and child who came out, and all who came in, I kept my proximity silent as the grave. Determining to attack [the gunboats and surprise it if possible, I waited until 12 o'clock at night, moved the artillery to within a mile by horses, unlimbered and dragged the guns up to within 50 feet of the boat, covered all bridges with weeds, carried the ammunition by hand to the guns, d
fatigue of the retreat out of Kentucky. Then followed the battle of Shiloh, where General Shaver commanded the brigade under General Hindman. Colonel Shaver was born in Sullivan county, east Tennessee, and came to Arkansas in 1851, settling at Batesville and engaging in merchandise. He was educated at Emory and Henry college, Virginia, and had not received any military training. At the time the war began he was doing business about twenty miles east of Batesville, in what was then Lawrence, Batesville, in what was then Lawrence, now Sharp county. He entered with enthusiasm into the raising of troops for the service. As the Confederate government was very slow about receiving volunteers for the service, Arkansans generally flocked to the State service. Col. Robert G. Shaver is now major-general of the State guard and reserve militia of Arkansas. The Eighth Arkansas regiment was originally organized at Jacksonport, in the summer of 1861, under command of Col. William K. Patterson, Lieutenant-Colonel Crouch and Maj.
medical colleges at which each was graduated, given with each name in this and following lists, are omitted in this copy. Surg. J. M. Keller, appointed medical director, June 16, 1862, was transferred east at the close of that year at his request, and Surg. J. M. Haden held the position at Shreveport, La., until May 1, 1864, when he was styled Chief of Medical Bureau. Year ending December 31, 1862: Charles M. Taylor, Napoleon, Ark., surgeon Little Rock hospital. L. A. Dickson, Batesville, Ark., surgeon Little Rock hospital. S. W. Vaughan, Hamburg, Ark., surgeon Pleasants' infantry. James C. Gee, West Point, Ark., assistant surgeon Arkansas Post hospital. James S. White, Memphis, Tenn., surgeon Little Rock hospital. LaFayette Yates, Paris, Tex., assistant surgeon Texas battery. Albert Dunlap, Fort Smith, Ark., surgeon Little Rock hospital. Jesse M. Pace, Camden, assistant surgeon Grinsted's Arkansas infantry. Alexander M. Clingman, Hot Springs, Ark., assistant surgeon Little