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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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After this great artillery demonstration all was comparatively quiet at Pensacola harbor until the afternoon of January 1, 1862, when the Federals opened fire on a small private steamer that had imprudently run to the navy yard. In the absence of General Bragg the Confederate batteries returned the fire, and a brisk cannonade was kept up until dark. The main damage done on shore was the burning of a large and valuable storehouse in the navy yard. Late in February the disasters in Tennessee and Kentucky persuaded the war department to authorize the abandonment of the Florida ports, and General Bragg, who had been transferred to Mobile, ordered General Samuel Jones, then in charge at Pensacola, to make dispositions at the earliest moment, working night and day, to abandon the works, removing the heavy guns with ammunition to Mobile, and other supplies to Montgomery. His instructions were: I desire you particularly to leave nothing the enemy can use; burn all from Fort McRee t
ral Bragg's army in Mississippi were countermanded and they were put on duty to guard the city. When General Bragg's army was transferred from Mississippi to east Tennessee preparatory to an onward movement toward the Ohio river, the Third regiment was transferred to Chattanooga early in August, 1862, and camped near the foot of ed to the brigade of Gen. John C. Brown in Gen. Patton Anderson's division. With the army the Florida regiments marched across the Cumberland mountains into middle Tennessee and thence northward into Kentucky. After a few days' delay they proceeded toward Louisville, camping at different points, part of the time a few miles froms a faithless prophet of evil. One by one they fell by the wayside. Some lie buried by Georgia streams, some on the hillsides of Alabama, some in the valley of Tennessee, some on the bloody fields of Kentucky, some under the blue skies of Mississippi; some survived and struggled on until they reached the Carolinas; while a few ca
Biographical. Major-General James Patton Anderson was born in Tennessee about 1820. Like other enterprising Americans he lived in so mant Greensboro, N. C. After the close of hostilities he returned to Tennessee and died at Memphis in 1873. Brigadier-General Robert Bullock e was made lieutenant colonel. In 1862 this regiment served in East Tennessee in the brigade of Gen. W. G. M. Davis. The department was at tFlorida acted a gallant part in it all. During the campaign into Tennessee Colonel Bullock led Finley's brigade, and was one of the gallant to report to Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, and were assigned to east Tennessee, where they were kept busy watching the movements of the enemy,adier-general and was placed in command of the department of East Tennessee. His brigade embraced the First Florida cavalry, the Sixth and Sed as colonel of the Sixth Florida regiment. He was on duty in east Tennessee in Davis' brigade, Heth's division, Kirby Smith's department; t