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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition. You can also browse the collection for Linnaeus or search for Linnaeus in all documents.

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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 4: 1829-1830: Aet. 22-23. (search)
me; I would gladly have read, as he did, everything that had been written before my time; but there were authors who wearied me, and I confess that at that age Linnaeus was among the number. I found him dry, pedantic, dogmatic, conceited; while I was charmed with Aristotle, whose zoology I have read and re-read ever since at inrvals of two or three years. I must, however, do myself the justice to add, that after I knew more of the history of our science I learned also duly to reverence Linnaeus. But a student, already familiar with the works of Cuvier, and but indifferently acquainted with the earlier progress of zoology, could hardly appreciate the met required more familiarity than mine then was with the gradual growth of the science, from Aristotle onward, to understand how great and beneficial an influence Linnaeus had exerted upon modern natural history. I cannot review my Munich life without deep gratitude. The city teemed with resources for the student in arts, lette