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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

her on the banks of the Appomattox, like mailed champions armed to the teeth, while Richmond, the prize of the struggle, waited apart, till her fate should be decided. The map of the battle of Five Forks shows the fortifications around Petersburg, and that of the Appomattox campaign those around Richmond. On the 31st of October, 1864, there were one hundred and fifty-three pieces in position on the national lines, of which twenty were field artillery; and at the fall of Richmond, in April, 1865, one hundred and seventy-five guns were captured, of which forty-one were either 6 or 12 pounders. This does not include the artillery found in the city, nor that taken in the field. In my account of the works around Richmond and Petersburg, I have made free use of papers by Major-General Wright, Chief of Engineers, United States Army, and Lieutenant-Colonel Michie, also of the Engineers, published in the Report on the Defences of Washington, by Major-General Barnard, of the same corp
000; at Sheridan's headquarters the loss was estimated at 700. General Warren reported his numbers at 12,000, and the losses in the Fifth corps were 634. The former adjutant-general of the army of Northern Virginia estimates the rebel losses at 7,000. See Four Years with General Lee. See also Appendix for Official Statement of the Effective Force of the Cavalry under Command of Major-General Sheridan, in the Operations of Dinwiddie Court-House, Va., March 31, 1865, and Five Forks, Va., April, 1865, with remarks. Thus, the daring but desperate manoeuvre of Lee had failed, and, in fact, recoiled on himself. The troops that he had dispatched to crush Sheridan were necessarily separated, as we have seen, from the main rebel line, and although at first they threatened the national cavalry, the prompt action of Grant in forwarding reinforcements gave Sheridan the chance to fall upon this detached force. Sheridan caught eagerly at the opportunity, and, though disappointed and detain
the old renown of the army of Northern Virginia. The rebel writers, not satisfied with the legitimate glory won by the defenders of Fort Gregg, have magnified it into something marvellous. They declare that the garrison was only two hundred and fifty strong, and that these fought until only thirty were left alive. As the fort remained in the national possession, the rebels could not possibly have a knowledge of the number who surrendered. General Foster, who captured it, reported in April, 1865, before these fables were circulated, that two hundred and fifty were taken prisoner, officers and men, and fifty-seven dead were found inside. Fort Baldwin, the adjoining work, was at once evacuated, but the guns of Fort Gregg were turned on the retreating garrison, and the commander with sixty of his men surrendered. The line of investment was now materially shortened, and the national troops closed in around Petersburg. The prolonged defence of Fort Gregg, however, had given Le
ey belong, but that they will move promptly, and notify the commander of their action. I wish, also, to enjoin the same action on the part of division commanders, when other parts of their corps are engaged. In like manner, I would urge the importance of following up a repulse of the enemy. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-Generals Meade, Ord, and Sheridan. Statement showing the strength of the forces, under General Grant, operating against Richmond, Va., from March, 1864, to April, 1865, inclusive. month.Armies.present.present for duty Equiiped. commissioned officers.Enlisted men. For Duty.Extra or Daily Duty.Sick.In Arrest.Total.For Duty.Extra or Daily Duty.Sick.In Arrest or Confinement.Total.Aggregate.Cavalry.Artillery.Infantry.Total. 1864. MarchArmy of the Potomac.3,789683164524,68887,62914,4944,165841107,129111,81710,5926,30169,17986,072 April 30.Army of the Potomac.4.741753177765,74799,04814,9684,045794118,855124,60212,8647,78076,62997,273 April 30.Army of th
m the Records of Prisoners of War filed in this office: The number of rebel prisoners captured in the battles of the army of the Potomac, army of the James, and cavalry command of General Sheridan, between the 29th day of March, 1865, and the 9th day of April, 1865, inclusive, amount to 46,495. The number of rebel prisoners paroled at Appomattox court-house, Virginia, April 9, 1865, amount to 27,416. The number of rebel prisoners paroled at Richmond, Virginia, during the month of April, 1865, amount to 1,610. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Samuel Breck, Assistant Adjutant-General. Losses in the army of the Potomac from March 29 to April 9, 1865, Compiled from the records of the Adjutant-General's office. commands.killed.wounded.missing.aggregate Officers.Men.Total.Officers.Men.Total.Officers.Men.Total. Provost Guard Nothing in reports or returns. City Point (Post) Nothing in reports or returns. Engineer Brigade Nothing in report