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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 149 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 125 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 6 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 88 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 83 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 51 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 41 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for William Nelson or search for William Nelson in all documents.

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valry was brought from across the Blue Ridge, where the country was exhausted of forage, and sent west. . . . Rosser's brigade had to be temporarily disbanded, and the men allowed to go to their homes. . . Most of the guns which were without horses were sent to Lynchburg by railroad. This was a deplorable state of things, but it could not be avoided, as the horses of the cavalry and artillery would have perished, had they been kept in the Valley. Two small brigades of Wharton's division and Nelson's battalion, with the few pieces of artillery which had been retained, were left as my whole available force. Early's Memoir, pp. 121 and 122. This was the origin of the complaint, and the cause of the outcry. The enemy felt that the measure was a military success; that it not only compelled the present abandonment of the Valley, but destroyed all hope of return. The supplies were not only annihilated, but could not be renewed during the war. Washington could never again be threate
surer of the Sons of Liberty, having complete proof of his assisting Shanks to escape, and plotting to release prisoners at this camp. Most of these rebel officers were in the city on the same errand in August last, their plan being to raise an insurrection and release prisoners of war at this camp. There are many strangers and suspicious persons in the city, believed to be guerillas and rebel soldiers. The plan was to attack the camp on election. All prisoners arrested are in camp. Captain Nelson and A. C. Coventry, of the police, rendered very efficient service. J. B. Sweet, Colonel Commanding Post. Mr. White to Secretary Stanton.—(telegram.) Chicago, November 7, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Colonel Sweet, by his energetic and decisive measures last night, has undoubtedly saved Camp Douglas from being opened, and the city from conflagration. I respectfully suggest that you send him a word of commendation. Horace White. Statement showing the strength o
12; at battle of Dinwiddie, 468-472; at battle of Five Forks, 495; pursuit to Appomattox, 524, 547, 552, 560; at battle of Sailor's creek, 573-575; moves on Appomattox court-house, 592. Middle Military Division created, II., 502. miles, General Nelson A., at battle of Ream's station, II., 527; at White Oak road, III., 505; at Sutherland station, 523-525. Milledgeville abandoned by rebels, III., 288. Millen captured by Sherman, III., 223, 289. Milliken's bend, concentration of Gra29; Sherman's campaign in Carolinas, 373; under Schofield in North Carolina, 377; under Sheridan, February, 1865, 412; before Richmond, March, 1864, 438; in Appomattox campaign, 442; at Five Forks, 495; under Wilson, March, 1865, 637. Nelson, General, William, crosses the Tennessee, i., 86. New Hope church, battle at, II., 337-536. New York, incendiarism in, III., 170; disloyalty in, 171; Grant's visit to, 194. North Anna, movements on, II., 225-237. North, misapprehension of Gran