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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 37 3 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 28 28 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 17 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 9 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Franklin (Tennessee, United States) or search for Franklin (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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e he fought bravely, he was made colonel of the Eighth Arkansas regiment. He fought gallantly at Perryville and at Murfreesboro, where he was wounded. At Chickamauga he commanded a brigade and won high commendation on account of his skill and valor. He took part in the Sequatchie raid, and after its termination was recommended by General Wheeler as one of four officers he was authorized to select for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general. He was killed while leading a charge at Franklin, Tenn., August 20, 1864, deeply regretted by his comrades, who loved and admired him for his many noble qualities. Gen. John Gregg, although a native of Alabama, entered the service from Texas, his adopted State, as lieutenant-colonel of the Seventh Texas. He was captured at Fort Donelson, and when exchanged, was assigned to the command of a brigade and was soon after made brigadier-general, in which position he was conspicuous for his courage and ability as a leader. He was killed while
of its number, killed and wounded; participated in all the subsequent battles of the army of Tennessee and was distinguished in the Dalton and Atlanta campaign; engaged in the battles in front of Dalton, May 7th to 12th; Resaca, May 14th and 15th; Cassville, May 18th; New Hope Church, May 25th, and Pickett's Mill, May 27th. The regiment was also in battle at Peachtree Creek, July 20th; Atlanta, July 22d; Jonesboro, August 31st and September 1st; Lovejoy's Station, September 2d to 6th; Franklin, Tenn., November 30th, and Nashville, December 15th and 16th. The Eighteenth was then ordered to Mobile and participated in the defense of Spanish Fort, March 26 to April 8, 1865. Among the officers killed were: Lieut.-Col. Richard F. Inge, Captains Justice, Stringer, Hammond, and Mickle, and Lieutenants Fielder, McAdory and Kidd, all of whom met death at Chickamauga. Its commanding officers were: Colonel Inge, whose name heads the roll of honor of the killed and wounded at Chickamauga,
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the Western army in which Albama troops were engaged. (search)
e, Tenn., Mar. 21. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 12.—Federal, total loss 50. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., and 8th Conf. Cav. Brentwood, Franklin, Tenn., Mar. 25. Gen. Forrest; loss 4 k. 4 w, 25 m.—Federal; loss 4 k, 19 w, 40 m. Alabama troops, Forrest's Cav., and 7th, 53d Cav. Woodbury, Tenn., April 1. Pettus. Alabama troops, 20th, 23d, 30th, 31st, 46th Inf. Spring Hill, Tenn., Nov. 29. Gen. Hood, 40,000; loss 750k.—Federal, Gen. Schofield, 28,000. Franklin, Tenn., Nov. 30. Gen. Hood, 40,000; loss 1750 k, 3800 w, 702 m.—Federal, 28,000; loss 189 k, 1033 w, 1104 m. Confederate troops, Cheatham's and Stewart's corps, aree Gap, Tenn., Dec. 17. Gen. Hood; total loss 413. Alabama troops, 18th, 1gth, 22d, 25th, 32d, 36th, 38th, 39th, 50th, 58th Inf., and McKenzie's Batty. Franklin, Tenn., Dec. 17. Gen. Hood; total loss 1800. Alabama troops, army of Tennessee, as at Nashville. Pine Barren Cr., Fla., Dec. 17 to 19. Gen. Maury.—Federal,
ps, embracing the brigades of Allen and Dibrell, to which Hannon's brigade was added. His career was now signalized by a series of brilliant exploits. He acted a very prominent part in Cleburne's brilliant success at Pickett's mill, May 27, 1864, and in all the movements of the Atlanta campaign Kelly's men were always ready for the fiercest fight, either on foot or mounted. On the expedition to the rear of Sherman's army in August, 1864, his command was again actively employed. Near Franklin, Tenn., on August 20th, during Wheeler's raid against Sherman's communications in Tennessee, this valiant young leader was killed. In his report General Wheeler paid him this tribute: To my brave division commander, General Kelly, who gave up his life at Franklin, while gallantly fighting at the head of his division, I ask the country to award its gratitude. No honors bestowed on his memory could more than repay his devotion. In 1866 General Kelly's remains were removed to Mobile and laid t