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tered in this terrible night struggle. Among the killed were Col. W. H. Bishop and Maj. G. W. Reynolds. Lieut.-Col. W. H. Sims, Capt. J. M. Hicks, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Johnson, all regimental commanders, were wounded, and Maj. J. K. Allen reported missing. At Nashville Sears' brigade was attached to Walthall's division, which, with Loring's, fought creditably in the battle. Loring's division occupied a line one mile long, across the Granny White pike, on the left of the army. On the 15th of December, after the redoubts in front had been lost, Loring's men were ordered to re-form in line at right angles to their former position, to check the rush of the exulting enemy. This was gallantly and successfully done by this fine division, General Stewart reported. Brigadier-General Sears late in the day lost a leg and was captured. On the next day the repeated assaults of the enemy were repelled with vigor until about the middle of the afternoon. The brigades of Sharp and Brantly fough
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
e engaged in the desperate fight at Allatoona, in reporting which French acknowledged his indebtedness to Sears' bravery, skill and unflinching firmness. At the battle of Franklin, Tenn., his brigade won new honors, many of the men and officers gaining the main line of the Federal works in the famous charge. Subsequently he co-operated with Forrest in the siege of Murfreesboro, whence he was ordered to Nashville, where he commanded his brigade with skill and firmness until late on the 15th of December, when he was severely wounded, losing a leg, and fell into the hands of the enemy. The surviving fragment of his brigade was surrendered by Gen. Richard Taylor in May, 1865, and General Sears was restored to his home at the close of hostilities. Brigadier-General Jacob H. Sharp entered the Confederate service in a subordinate position, and from Shiloh, through the Kentucky campaign and at Murfreesboro, fought his way to the front until we find him at Chickamauga colonel of the Forty