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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Corse or search for Corse in all documents.

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d's operations against Sherman's communications in north Georgia, Stewart's corps, the old army of Mississippi, took the most conspicuous part, and it was French's division which made the sanguinary and famous attack upon the Federal garrison at Allatoona, October 6th. The Confederates kept up an assault upon the Federal redoubts from seven in the morning until two in the afternoon, and after losing 800 out of 2,000 men were compelled to retire by the approach of Sherman, who had signalled Corse, commanding the garrison, Hold the fort, for I am coming. Sears' brigade lost 37 killed and 114 wounded and 200 missing. Among the killed was Col. W. H. Clark, Forty-sixth regiment; Colonel Barry, Thirty-fifth, and Major Parkin, Thirty-sixth, were among the wounded. Nowhere in the course of the great war was the reckless valor of the Mississippians more brilliantly illustrated than on that gloomy November evening when the army of George H. Thomas, brought to bay on the Harpeth river, was
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
ready and believed in his fidelity and honor. He served under Johnston and then under Polk in Mississippi, and was in Polk's (afterward Stewart's) corps under Johnston and Hood in 1864. He and his division, consisting of the brigades of Cockrell, Ector and Sears, were engaged in all the battles of the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns, and were surpassed by none in heroic devotion to the cause of the South. In the fall campaign in north Georgia it was French who made the gallant attack upon Corse at Allatoona. He had driven the Federals from their outer works and into a little star fort, and was pressing the attack with vigor when he was informed of the approach of Sherman's army. He was compelled reluctantly to retire when victory was almost in his grasp. At the battle of Kenesaw Mountain it was the guns of French on Kenesaw that poured such a destructive fire upon the Union forces, who had broken through the right of Walker's skirmishers, as to drive them back before they came w