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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 103 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 50 2 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 10 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 6 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Carnot Posey or search for Carnot Posey in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

Adams Light Guard, No. 1, Capt. Robert Clarke. Adams Light Guard, No. 2, Capt. S. E. Baker. Quitman Invincibles, Capt. John F. McGowan. Monroe Guards, Capt. F. M. Rodgers. Benton Relief Rifle Guards, Capt. B. G. Lawrence. Rough and Readies, Capt. H. E. Williamson. Burt Rifles, Capt. E. R. Burt. Beauregard Rifles, Capt. A. S. Lee. Agency Rifles, Capt. John M. Ware. Quitman Guards, Capt. Samuel A. Matthews. Lexington Guards, Capt. L. R. Page. Wilkinson Rifles, Capt. C. Posey. Jasper Grays, Capt. J. J. Shannon. Meridian Invincibles, Capt. W. F. Crumpton. Claiborne Rangers, Capt. J. Taylor Moore. Clayton Guards, Captain Vaughn. Rankin Rough and Readies, Capt. E. J. Runnels. Panola Vindicators, Capt. Geo. P. Foote. Buena Vista Rifles, Capt. T. L. Rogers. In the month of August, 1861, the organization of the eight regiments ordered to be raised by the ordinance of the convention, adopted January 23d, was completed. These were put under com
sons of the State who participated. On December 8, 1861, the Mississippi regiments in the Potomac district were ordered to be organized in brigades as follows: Second, Col. W. C. Falkner; Eleventh, Col. W. H. Moore; Thirteenth, Col. William Barksdale; Seventeenth, Col. W. S. Featherston; Eighteenth, Col. T. M. Griffin—to form the First brigade, General Whiting, of the First division, which was under the command of Major-General Van Dorn. The Twelfth, Col. Henry Hughes; Sixteenth, Col. Carnot Posey; Nineteenth, Col. H. C. Mott; and the Twenty-first, Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys, were to compose the Fifth brigade of the same division, under Richard Griffith, promoted to brigadier-general. The last brigade was actually formed with the substitution of the Thirteenth for the Twelfth, and at the beginning of 1862 was stationed under D. H. Hill at Leesburg; but the other brigade was for some reason not formed, and the regiments remained separated—the Twelfth in Rodes' brigade, the Nin
colonelcy and the increase of his battalion to a full regiment. In the meantime the Sixteenth Mississippi was fighting with Jackson in the valley of the Shenandoah. Its brigade, Trimble's, bore the brunt of the fight at Cross Keys, when Col. Carnot Posey and Lieuts. J. B. Coleman and W. R. Brown were wounded. Besides these, 6 men were killed and 25 wounded. General Trimble in his report called attention to services performed on this occasion and previously by Captain Brown, of Company A, wdrove the enemy before them. General McLaws said that the ground over which Barksdale advanced was thickly strewn with the dead and wounded of the enemy, far exceeding our own, and their dead were much more numerous than their wounded. Col. Carnot Posey, who commanded Featherston's brigade at Sharpsburg, was mentioned by Longstreet as among the most prominently distinguished of his division. His brigade suffered a loss of 44 killed and 260 wounded. As an instance of the experience of the
R. H. Anderson's division, and commanded by Brig.-Gen. Carnot Posey, was composed of the Twelfth regiment, Lieu While Barksdale was left to defend Fredericksburg, Posey's brigade was fighting brilliantly at Chancellorsville. Posey and Mahone had been stationed at United States ford, and were among the first to confront the enemy i were left to hold the ford, while the remainder of Posey's brigade fell back to Chancellorsville and thence, up to Jackson's flank movement. Thence, on May 1st, Posey's men marched on the plank road, leading Jackson's armishers, but Colonel Harris fell severely wounded. Posey then pushed on to the enemy's line of works. The sks front on account of Jackson's success on the left, Posey advanced, capturing many prisoners and arms, to a po in killed and wounded was 212. After this battle Posey's brigade was assigned to Hill's corps, but the two Hood on the extreme right stormed Little Round Top. Posey charged on the left of Anderson's division, and Bark
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
rigadier-general to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of General Posey. The brigade to whose command he now succeeded was composed of raiding bands as far as his resources would permit. Brigadier-General Carnot Posey was born in Wilkinson county, Miss., in August, 1818. the record of American valor. In this splendid feat of arms, young Posey bore a manly part and was disabled by a wound. When the war ended ctional strife that had been so long smoldering broke out into war, Posey entered the service of the Confederacy as colonel of the Sixteenth endous victory at Fredericksburg. Before the last named battle Colonel Posey's meritorious and gallant conduct had been rewarded by a commis campaign of 1863, at Chancellorsville and again at Gettysburg, General Posey conducted himself with the gallantry for which he had always been distinguished. At Bristoe station, on the 14th of October, General Posey was severely wounded in the left thigh by a fragment of shell.