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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 374 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 130 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 113 13 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 74 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 61 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 7 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Richard Taylor or search for Richard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Parks, Sixteenth; Lieutenants Harvey, Murray's battalion, Wade and Color-bearer Bland, Fifty-first and Fifty-second regiments, and Captain Whaley and Lieutenant Craig, Twenty-eighth. Among the wounded were Cols. John H. Anderson, Eighth; D. M. Donnell, Sixteenth; Maj. Thomas G. Randle, Captains Puryear, Cullum and Pond, and Lieutenants Cunningham, Leonard, Fiynt and Shaw, Eighth; Lieutenants Potter, Owen, Fisher and Worthington, Sixteenth; Captain McDonald and Lieutenants Apple, Danley and Taylor, Twenty-eighth; Adjutant Caruthers, Lieutenants Banks and Ridout, Thirty-eighth; and Captain Burton, Lieutenants Billings, Chester, White, Haynie, Tilman, Fifty-first and Fifty-second. During the battle of the 19th the Twenty-sixth Tennessee wavered for a moment (as reported by General Cheatham), and seemed to be in the act of falling back, when the intrepid Col. S. S. Stanton seized the colors of his regiment and, rushing to the front, called his men to follow him. Inspired by this heroi
but doubt if we can do that yet. If the Spanish Captain-General Weyler, of Cuba, had issued and published this letter of instructions to a subordinate officer, the press, the pulpit, the halls of Congress of the United States would have rung with fierce denunciation of the savage spirit of its author, and public opinion would outlaw his memory. The remnant of the army of Tennessee retired from Corinth to Tupelo, Miss., on the 23d of January, 1865. General Hood was relieved and Lieut.-Gen. Richard Taylor assigned to command. After a few days of needed rest and preparation, the troops of Lee's, Stewart's and Cheatham's corps, in the order named, were moved by rail to South Carolina. During the month (January) the Congress adopted this resolution: That if the President will appoint Gen. J. E. Johnston to the command of the army of Tennessee it will, in the opinion of the Congress of the Confederate States, be hailed with joy by the army and will receive the approval of the countr
; the Eighth Texas, Col. John A. Wharton; the Second Georgia, Colonel Lawton, and two companies of Kentuckians under Captains Taylor and Waltham. He made forced marches to Murfreesboro, arriving at 4:30 a. m. of the 13th in front of that place, theho was preparing to enter upon his disastrous campaign to Franklin and Nashville. On the 27th of January, 1865, Gen. Richard Taylor, commanding department, assigned General Forrest to the command of the district of Mississippi and Louisiana. On s later the army of Tennessee was surrendered, followed by the surrender of the troops in the department commanded by General Taylor. On the 9th of May, General Forrest issued an address of farewell to his command, in which he said, You have been good soldiers, you can be good citizens. Gen. Richard Taylor said of Forrest, Like Lord Clive, nature made him a great soldier. His tactics deserve the closest study of military men. He employed the tactics of Frederick at Leuthen and Zorndorf, tho
largely in securing the nomination of his neighbor, James K. Polk, for the presidency. In July, 1846, he abandoned peaceful pursuits to accept a commission as brigadier-general of Tennessee volunteers in the Mexican war. At first he served with Taylor in northern Mexico, but was transferred to Scott's command at the beginning of the siege of Vera Cruz. In this siege he took an active part, and was appointed one of the American commissioners to receive the surrender of the city. At Cerro Gord post of Atlanta, Ga., and remained in command of the same until its evacuation, when he was assigned to duty at Macon, Ga. His last military duties were performed as commander of the district of North Mississippi and West Tennessee, under Gen. Richard Taylor, by whom he was surrendered at Grenada, Miss. General Wright was warmly commended for his services at Belmont and Shiloh. At Murfreesboro he commanded the Eighth, Sixteenth, Twenty-eighth, Thirty-eighth, Fifty-first and Fifty-second Tenn