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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 150 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 49 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 38 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 26 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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. Armstrong reported from Middleburg, Tenn., on the 1st of September, 1862: Just finished whipping the enemy in front of Bolivar. Ran him in town and captured 71 prisoners, of whom 4 were commissioned officers. Among the Federal dead were two colonels. After this affair, General Armstrong crossed the Hatchie river, passed between Jackson and Bolivar, and destroyed the bridges and trestles between the two places. On his return toward the village of Denmark he encountered two regiments of ie acclaim the country accorded the glory. Forrest entered west Tennessee on the 4th of December, 1863, and arrived at Bolivar on the 5th. He took with him McDonald's battalion and a section of Morton's battery, numbering 250 trained soldiers, anin the face of danger was the only sin. On the 29th of March, Colonel Neely, Thirteenth Tennessee, engaged Hurst near Bolivar, capturing his entire wagon train, routing and driving him on the wings of the wind to Memphis and killing 30 and captu
ulations of General Bragg. In August, 1862, he was sent with about 2,000 cavalry to make a demonstration in west Tennessee in co-operation with Bragg, and preparatory to Price's advance. He crossed the Hatchie river, passed between Jackson and Bolivar, destroyed bridges and trestles on the Memphis & Charleston railroad, drove the Federals into Bolivar, August 30th, and on his return defeated their infantry, cavalry and artillery at Britton's lane, near Denmark, capturing 213 prisoners and twoBolivar, August 30th, and on his return defeated their infantry, cavalry and artillery at Britton's lane, near Denmark, capturing 213 prisoners and two pieces of artillery. Said General Price: The highest praise should be awarded to General Armstrong for the prudence, discretion and good sense with which he conducted this expedition. His cavalry force, the regiments of Wirt Adams and Slemons, did gallant service during the fighting of Price's army at Iuka in September, and on October 3d, 4th and 5th at Corinth and the crossing of the Hatchie, covering the retreat as well as providing a bridge for the transportation of the army. General Mau