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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the next morning Lieutenant Ritter and his men proceeded to the depot, and took the cars for Selma, having turned over the guns and horses to the quartermas-ter. From Selma to Montgomery, and thence to Atlanta, Georgia, where they arrived on the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so thalow the enemy on to Chattanooga. The remainder of the command marched for the Red-House Ford, and halted about noon. During that night I received orders to march the entire command back to Chattanooga, and moved in pursuance thereof early on the 23d. We reached the Watkins House about 11 o'clock A. M., and proceeded to take up a line around the enemy's position at Chatanooga. I desire to mention the following named officers as distinguished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
questions with regard to his section, how long it had been on detached service, where it had been, &c. He said that as soon as he returned to his office, he would order the section to its original command. On the 19th of October the order came, and the next morning Lieutenant Ritter and his men proceeded to the depot, and took the cars for Selma, having turned over the guns and horses to the quartermas-ter. From Selma to Montgomery, and thence to Atlanta, Georgia, where they arrived on the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a four gun battery were received, and Dr. Thomas J. Rogers was assigned to the battery as surgeon. On the 29th of Octob
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
n the afternoon for the march. The rear of the right wing did not move until quite dark. I did not, therefore, put my wing in motion till daylight the following morning. Before moving on the morning of the 22d, McLaws's division was ordered to follow the enemy on to Chattanooga. The remainder of the command marched for the Red-House Ford, and halted about noon. During that night I received orders to march the entire command back to Chattanooga, and moved in pursuance thereof early on the 23d. We reached the Watkins House about 11 o'clock A. M., and proceeded to take up a line around the enemy's position at Chatanooga. I desire to mention the following named officers as distinguished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods, Buckner, Hindman and Stewart; Brigadier-Generals B. R. Johnson, Preston, Law, (respectively in command of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorab
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
d to yield, however, and General Lee did not think it worth while to compel him, and proceeded on his way. On the 14th he passed through Snake Creek Gap to Villenow, where he joined the two other corps. The latter under Stewart and Cheatham, had been sent to Tilton and Dalton to capture those places, and tear up the railroad as far as Tunnel Hill, which they did. The march continued through Chattanooga Valley to Gadsden, Ala., where the wagon trains and artillery rejoined the army. On the 23d the army started for Tennessee, marching across Sand Mountain to Decatur, Ala., and thence to Florence on the south bank of the Tennessee river. The pontoon bridge was soon ready and on the 6th of November Johnston's battalion crossed and rejoined the corps, which had passed over several days before. Cheatham's corps crossed on the 13th and Stewart's a few days later. By the 20th of November all the troops had crossed the Tennessee river, and through rain and snow the advance upon Nash