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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 355 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 147 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 137 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 135 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 125 13 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 108 38 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 85 7 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 84 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Banks or search for Banks in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
was to co-operate with the Federal army under Banks, then moving against Shreveport. His shortestManassas and Kernstown, and the retreat before Banks had already done that, for all save fools. Aed troops. Neither had any pontoon train, for Banks had burned his in his impotent flight in May. for drawing supplies or for retreating. When Banks first pursued him up the Valley, he had turnedStore in the mouth of Swift Run Gap. And then Banks began to get his first glimpse of his lesson ie expected swoop of the vulture. Forward, General Banks. Carpe diem; the road is open. But Banks Banks would not forward—could not! There was a poised eagle upon the vulture's flank, with talons and ber out the vitals beneath his left wing. Shall Banks face to the left and drag the eagle from his a right and left, to devour the assailant. No, Banks cannot even try that! What then shall he try?ing, rending crash at Winchester. And Masters Banks and Shields find themselves with incomprehensi[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
curred, in which the enemy suffered considerable loss and were driven back upon the main body. Greene, on the enemy's left had attacked and driven in with loss his flankers to the main body. On the night of the 1st Steele encamped near Spoonville, having marched only ten miles. Shelby encamped that night near Arkadelphia, Cabell on the Antoine, and Greene was at nightfall about eight miles east of Spooneville. The design of the enemy evidently was to co-operate with the Federal army under Banks, then moving against Shreveport. His shortest route to Shreveport was by way of Washington. The crossing of the Little Missouri river on the military road was a good one. The latest information from my scouts on the 1st (I was then with Greene's column) was that Steele had certainly advanced as far as Spooneville, on the direct Washington road. These facts taken into consideration, I ordered Colonel Greene to leave Lawther's regiment of his brigade on the enemy's left flank, and, marching
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
Manassas and Kernstown, and the retreat before Banks had already done that, for all save fools. A at McDowell in the early May of 1862, that of Banks at Winchester; the concentration of Generals Fed troops. Neither had any pontoon train, for Banks had burned his in his impotent flight in May. for drawing supplies or for retreating. When Banks first pursued him up the Valley, he had turnedStore in the mouth of Swift Run Gap. And then Banks began to get his first glimpse of his lesson ie expected swoop of the vulture. Forward, General Banks. Carpe diem; the road is open. But Banks Banks would not forward—could not! There was a poised eagle upon the vulture's flank, with talons and ber out the vitals beneath his left wing. Shall Banks face to the left and drag the eagle from his a right and left, to devour the assailant. No, Banks cannot even try that! What then shall he try?ing, rending crash at Winchester. And Masters Banks and Shields find themselves with incomprehensi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ly descends with Jackson on the right and rear of McClellan, and ere thirty days have passed since he assumed command, Richmond has been saved, and the fields around her made immortal; and the broken ranks of McClellan are crouching for protection under the heavy guns of the iron-clads at Harrison's Landing. Sixty days more, and the siege of Richmond has been raised,—the Confederate columns are marching Northward, Jackson in the advance, has on August 9th caught up again with his old friend Banks, at Slaughter's Mountain, and punished him terribly, and as the day closes August 30th, Manassas has the second time been the scene of a general engagement with like results as the first. John Pope, who thitherto according to his pompous boast, had seen only the backs of his enemies, has had his curiosity entirely satisfied with a brief glimpse of their faces; and the proud army of the Potomac is flying in hot haste to find shelter in the entrenchments of Washington. In early September the