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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Cockrell or search for Cockrell in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
and Lewis. The army was thought to have become discouraged by the numerous disasters that had befallen it for many months past, and the officers, on this occasion, seem to have felt it to be their duty to give nerve to their troops by exposing themselves, to an extraordinary extent, to the dangers of the battle. All the field officers remained mounted during the charge. At daylight on the morning after the fight, Lieutenant Ritter rode over the field, and in the part of the line where Cockrell's Missourians charged the enemy's defences, he found the dead lying thick, piled one upon another, till the earth was hid by the woeful spectacle. Near this point, upon the right, General Lewis's horse was found lying upon the top of the works, and fifty yards within the enemy's main line of fortifications, a single Confederate soldier was found, face down, his head towards the enemy, having penetrated thus far alone, before he was shot. At midnight the Third Maryland was ordered to the