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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dearing or search for Dearing in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
to cut him off from his Bermuda base. You will take up your position, to-night, at Swift creek, with Wise's, Martin's, Dearing's, and two regiments of Colquitt's brigades, with about twenty field pieces, under Colonel Jones. At day-break, you wil, in the direction of heaviest firing, to attack enemy in rear or flank. You will protect your advance and flanks with Dearing's cavalry, taking necessary precautions to distinguish friends from foes. Please communicate this to General Hill. ut 1:45 P. M., gave some hope of his proximity. I waited in vain. The firing heard was probably an encounter between Dearing and the enemy's rear guard. Dearing had been ordered by Whiting to communicate with me, but unsupported as he was by inDearing had been ordered by Whiting to communicate with me, but unsupported as he was by infantry or artillery, he was unable to do so, except by sending a detachment by a circuitous route, which reached me after the work of the day was closed. At 4 P. M. all hope of Whiting's approach was gone, and I reluctantly abandoned so much of m