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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
of piracy. The schooner Savannah, formerly a United States pilot boat, on a cruise from Charleston harbor, was captured by the United States brig Perry, and Captain Baker and fourteen of the crew commanders, and constituted a brigade under General Shoup. Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. by Colonel Charles H. Olmstead. [The following paper was read by its gallant atour in every high wind. There is but to add that the main channel by which ships enter Charleston harbor runs within easy gunshot of Morris Island from one end of it to the other, then crosses toall re-assert herself it will go ill with this generation. Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. By Colonel Charles H. Olmstead. Paper no. 2. [Conclusion.] Our experience for the the nations. On June 3, 1861, the little schooner Savannah, previously a pilot boat in Charleston harbor and sailing under a commission issued by authority of the Confederate States, was captured
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
. A number of merchantmen were taken and sent into confederate or neutral ports or destroyed. In anticipation of such a mode of carrying on the war, President Lincoln on April 18, 1861, had issued a proclamation declaring that all persons taken on privateers that had molested a vessel of the United States should be held amenable to the laws of the United States for the prevention and punishment of piracy. The schooner Savannah, formerly a United States pilot boat, on a cruise from Charleston harbor, was captured by the United States brig Perry, and Captain Baker and fourteen of the crew were sent in irons to New York to be tried as pirates. It was proposed to hang them. Great commotion was excited in Libby prison on the 9th of November, 1861, by an order to General Winder to select thirteen of the Federal officers of highest rank, and confine them in cells, to be dealt with in the same manner as the crew of the Savannah should be. The name of Colonel Corcoran was the first draw
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. by Colonel Charles H. Olmstead. [The following paper was read by its gallant and accomplished author before the Georgia Historical Society, March 3d, 1879, and we are sure our readers will thank us for giving them an opportunity of enjoying its perusal. We only regret that the crowded condition of our pages compels us to divide it.] In preparing the following paper, it has been my desire only to record what its title suggests—persoa and presents a glaring stretch of white sandy hillocks, which were sparsely dotted with the coarse grasses of the coast, and which changed their contour in every high wind. There is but to add that the main channel by which ships enter Charleston harbor runs within easy gunshot of Morris Island from one end of it to the other, then crosses to the northward and passes between Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island, and Fort Sumter, built upon a shoal about midway between the two islands. Fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. By Colonel Charles H. Olmstead. Paper no. 2. [Conclusion.] Our experience for the next week was a trying one. Failing in the direct attack, the enemy's endeavor seemed to be to make our berth uncomfortably warm, and here the success was undoubted. Day after day the monitors—some four or five in number—and that tremendous war vessel, the New Ironsides, would take their positions directly opposite the fort, at a distance of six to eight hundred yards, the wooden ships being at much longer range. Then would be poured in upon us a steady stream of shot and shell, much more pleasant to dwell upon as a memory than it was to endure, while upon the land side new batteries were built by the enemy, and each day the weight of metal thrown against us would seem to be heavier than the day before. I well remember the approach of the first monitor. How deliberate its movements; how insignificant its appearance; the deck almost level with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate privateersmen. (search)
rdice. Happily for the United States, the threat was not executed, but the failure to carry out the declared purpose was coupled with humilitation, because it was the result of a notice to retaliate as fully as might need be to stop such a barbarous practice. To yield to the notice thus served was a practical admission by the United States government that the Confederacy had become a power among the nations. On June 3, 1861, the little schooner Savannah, previously a pilot boat in Charleston harbor and sailing under a commission issued by authority of the Confederate States, was captured by the United States brig Perry. The crew were placed in irons and sent to New York. It appeared, from statements made without contradiction, that they were not treated as prisoners of war, whereupon a letter was addressed by me to President Lincoln, dated July 6, stating explicitly that painful as will be the necessity, this Government will deal out to the prisoners held by it the same treatme