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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
e among the papers it is at your service. Or if it will better grace the waste basket, I am agreeable. Very truly yours, —— —— —— We need scarcely add that the article sent will find an early place in our papers. The following has the true ring: St. Louis, December 29th, 1883. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary: Dear Sir,—Your card of 17th inst. just received. I at once enclose and send you $3.00 currency, renewal subscription for papers and membership. I wore the Gray from May, 1861, to April, 1865, so am very naturally anxious to see the Southern Historical Society a success. Yours truly, —— —— —— The following from a distinguished soldier who wore the Blue will be appreciated, as his sentiments are cordially reciprocated: Boston, January 16th, 1884. My Dear Secretary,—Enclosed please find $3.00 in payment subscription for 1884, Southern Historical papers. Let me congratulate you and the Society on the success of your papers. T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
from abroad, had to provide, as a preliminary step, as an inexorable condition of existence, and of success in the terrible struggle which they had undertaken, for a free access to and a continued use of the sea. The ocean breeze was the breath of their nostrils; without it, suffocation was certain. A consideration of such vital importance could not escape the attention of one who, like General Beauregard, had been assigned to so high a position in the defence of his country. Early in May, 1861, when the blast of the clarion had hardly sounded defiance to the enemy, the General pressed upon the Government the adoption of a plan which seemed feasible, and which might have been of incalculable advantage to the Confederate States. A fleet of ten East India steamers was offered the Confederate Government, then at Montgomery, through Mr. W. L. Trenholm, speaking in the name and by authority of the house of John Frazer & Co., of Liverpool. His father, like himself, an American—Hon. G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
ries, and the aspirations of races, of people, and of nations. The real poet is under obligations to truth, for truth lives and stirs the heart, and perpetuates heroic deeds, and the desire to do them. Therefore there is no excuse for this slander and libel on the Confederate cause, the Confederate soldier and the Confederate hero. Not only is every allegation in the story of Barbara Fritchie false, but there never existed foundation for it. I was born in Frederick and lived there until May, 1861, when I joined the Confederate army. I had known Barbara Fritchie all my life. I knew where she lived, as well as I knew the town clock. At that time she was eighty-four years old, and had been bed-ridden for some time. She never saw a Confederate soldier, and probably no one of any kind. Her house was at the corner of Patrick street and the Town Creek bridge. The troops marched by there during a portion of the 10th of September. On that morning General Jackson and his staff rode i