Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Crittenden or search for Crittenden in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Bragg and the Chickamauga Campaign—a reply to General Martin. (search)
gg, was responsible for the failure to crush Crittenden; else he would not say that there are many lf moving down the Chickamauga Valley towards Crittenden's position, at Ringgold and the Mills, movedcentration was not a part of the movement on Crittenden. This dispatch, together with the extractaway from his companion corps. McCook and Crittenden remained. It was for General Bragg to electape, as Thomas had just done. But there lay Crittenden well out in the plain, isolated, at our mercr wasted. Instead of having his army across Crittenden's path, General Bragg had it at Lafayette. presents you a fine opportunity of striking Crittenden in detail, and I hope you will avail yourselal Bragg's sole effort to attack and destroy Crittenden's corps. That the effort was a failure ev presents you a fine opportunity of striking Crittenden in detail, and I hope you will avail yourselse by and in his power? when he did turn on Crittenden, why did he send Polk to attack him to the e[24 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
tand of arms, which had been thrown away by the flying enemy, were secured by my command. I learned that Steadman's division and troops from General Granger's reserve corps held the heights attacked by my division, and from captured artillerists, at Snodgrass' house, that the hill had been occupied by a battery of the regular army and another from Ohio. Among the wounded at Snodgrass' house, where a hospital had been established by the enemy, were many prisoners, some of whom were from Crittenden's corps, portions of which seem also to have occupied the hill. In the attack on the hill no artillery could be used by us effectively. The struggle was alone for the infantry. Few fell who were not struck down by the rifle or the musket. Whilst at the height of the engagement, the reserve artillery of Major Williams opened fire, by order of Major-General Buckner, on the rear lines of the enemy, but with what effect I could not judge. The fire served, however, to draw that of the en